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UM Rosenstiel School Announces 2018 Sea Secrets Lecture Series

Program kicks off with Jan. 23 lecture on lessons learned from Deepwater Horizon spill study

MIAMI—As the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science enters its 75th year of scientific discovery, it brings the South Florida community another great lineup of speakers on the latest scientific research and exploration of our planet during the 2018 Sea Secrets, a series of evening lectures designed for the non-scientific community. Each lecture will take place at the UM Rosenstiel School auditorium, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway on Virginia Key and begin with a reception at 6:30p.m. and program at 7:00 p.m.

On Tuesday, Jan. 23 UM Rosenstiel School Professor Martin Grosell will present his talk “In the Wake of an Environmental Disaster – Is There a Silver Lining?” in which he will discuss what was learned from the extensive research effort that took place following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill. Grosell is the lead Principal Investigator and Director of RECOVER (Relationships of Effects of Cardiac Outcomes in fish for Validation of Ecological Risk).

Sea Secrets is made possible by Bank of America and additional sponsors; First National Bank of South Miami, William J. Gallwey III, Esquire, Sheryl Gold, the Shepard Broad Foundation, Key Biscayne Community Foundation, Joan McCaughan Fund, Melissa and Taylor White, the Wang Family, and Southern Glazer’s Wine & Spirits.

The lectures, which run through May 15, are free and open to the public and designed to provide insight and information about our planet to a non-scientific audience. Seating is limited and RSVP is required. To register for one or more lectures, go to the Eventbrite link listed for each speaker. For more information, email: events@rsmas.miami.edu or call 305-421-4061. Winners of the Rosenstiel School Underwater Photo Contest will be announced during the May 15 lecture program.


2018 Sea Secrets Lecture Series schedule:

Tuesday, January 23, 2018 In the Wake of an Environmental Disaster – Is There a Silver Lining? at the UM Rosenstiel School auditorium, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway, Virginia Key, beginning with a reception at 6:30 p.m., followed by the lecture at 7:00 p.m.

Martin Grosell, Ph.D., UM Rosenstiel School Maytag professor of ichthyology

RSVP: https://seasecrets2018grosell.eventbrite.com

In his presentation, Grosell will discuss the impacts of the largest marine oil spill in U.S. history, the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill. Extensive research efforts have not only characterized the damage to the biology in the Gulf of Mexico, but have also taught the scientific community about first response strategies for future oil spills and have provided extensive information about the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem—the spawning grounds for many open ocean fish species including tunas, billfishes and mahi-mahi of high economic and ecological importance. His work to quantify the impact of the oil spill has provided a wealth of new baseline information about the life of these majestic top predators and the role they play in open oceans.



Tuesday, February 6, 2018 Ocean Science + Global Security = Ocean Security at the UM Rosenstiel School auditorium, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway, Virginia Key, beginning with a reception at 6:30 p.m., followed by the lecture at 7:00 p.m.

Jon White, President and CEO, Consortium for Ocean Leadership

RSVP: https://seasecrets2018white.eventbrite.com/

White will explore how our ocean specifically relates to many aspects of global security—national defense; homeland security; food, water, and energy security; economic prosperity; and human health and safety; and discuss opportunities for ocean scientific research and development to provide solutions that enable a healthy, sustainable and productive ocean that can answer the basic needs of humanity and enhance global security. The essential requirement for international and inter-disciplinary partnerships among scientific, government, and industrial sectors will also be discussed.

White, a native of Florida, joined the Consortium for Ocean Leadership in September 2015 and was named President and CEO in January 2016. Prior to this, he had a distinguished 32-year career in the U.S. Navy, including as commander, Naval Meteorology & Oceanography Command and director of Task Force Climate Change; and retired at the rank of rear admiral.



Tuesday, February 20, 2018 The Water Will Come at the UM Rosenstiel School auditorium, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway, Virginia Key, beginning with a reception at 6:30 p.m., followed by the lecture at 7:00 p.m.

Jeff Goodell, Contributing Editor at Rolling Stone and a Fellow at New America

RSVP: https://seasecrets2018goodell.eventbrite.com

Acclaimed journalist and book author Jeff Goodell travelled across 12 countries to interview scientists and leaders and report firsthand how climate change and sea level rise are affecting major cities, coastal villages, island nations... and the military. In a conversation with Miami Herald environmental reporter Jenny Staletovich, Goodell will discuss his new book, The Water Will Come: Rising Seas, Sinking Cities, and the Remaking of the Civilized World; and the power of science to inform good decisions. Jeff Goodell is the author of six books, including: How to Cool the Planet: Geoengineering and the Audacious Quest to Fix Earth’s Climate, which won the 2011 Grantham Prize Award of Special Merit, one of the highest awards in environmental journalism; and Big Coal: The Dirty Secret Behind America’s Energy Future, which the New York Times called “a compelling indictment of one of the country’s biggest, most powerful and most antiquated industries…well-written, timely, and powerful.” As a commentator on energy and climate issues, Goodell has appeared on NPR, MSNBC, CNN, CNBC, ABC, NBC, Fox News and The Oprah Winfrey Show.



Tuesday, March 13, 2018 The Human Element: A Photographer’s Journey in the Anthropocene at the UM Rosenstiel School auditorium, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway, Virginia Key, beginning with a reception at 6:30 p.m., followed by the lecture at 7:00 p.m.

James Balog, Founder & Director, Earth Vision Institute and Extreme Ice Survey

RSVP: https://seasecrets2018balog.eventbrite.com/

The Human Element is a riveting multimedia presentation revealing the Anthropocene revolution through James Balog’s unique global perspective as an environmental photographer, scientist, and mountaineer. His exploration of elemental substances—wildfire and wildlife, ice and water, air and climate—celebrates the amazing beauty of the world we all share, while leading us into a deeper and more sustainable relationship with nature. Balog founded the Extreme Ice Survey (EIS), the most wide-ranging, ground-based, photographic study of glaciers ever conducted. The project was featured in an internationally acclaimed, award-winning documentary Chasing Ice and in a PBS/NOVA special Extreme Ice. His work is housed in dozens of public and private art collections, including the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, the Corcoran Gallery, and the Denver Art Museum. He has been extensively published in most of the world’s major pictorial magazines, including National Geographic, Life, and Vanity Fair.



Tuesday, April 3, 2018 Climate and Sea Level Rise: What Can You Do About It? at the UM Rosenstiel School auditorium, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway, Virginia Key, beginning with a reception at 6:30 p.m., followed by the lecture at 7:00 p.m.

Maureen Raymo, Ph.D., research professor at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University

RSVP: https://seasecrets2018raymo.eventbrite.com/

Maureen Raymo's talk will explore the nature of natural climate variability and its relevance to current observed global warming. Her goal is to empower audiences to take ownership of planet Earth and help tackle one of the greatest challenges humanity has ever faced. Dr. Raymo is a geologist who studies the history and causes of climate and sea level change in Earth's past. In addition to publishing foundational work on the stratigraphy and chronology of recent geologic epochs, she has proposed hypotheses explaining why ice ages occur in Earth’s history, why ice sheets wax and wane with characteristic frequencies over the last few million years, and developed new ways of studying past sea level change. A fellow of the American Geophysical Union and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences, Dr. Raymo has participated in or led expeditions to Southern India, South Africa, Patagonia, Western Australia, and Tibet among other places; and she was co-chief scientist on a two-month Ocean Drilling Program expedition in the North Atlantic-Arctic region leading a 30-member scientific party.



Tuesday, May 15, 2018 The Blue Ocean: Perspectives from Marine Creatures at the UM Rosenstiel School auditorium, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway, Virginia Key, beginning with a reception at 6:30 p.m., followed by the lecture at 7:00 p.m.

David Gruber, Ph.D., professor of biology at City University of New York; 2017-2018 Radcliffe Fellow at Harvard University and Emerging Explorer at the National Geographic Society

RSVP: https://seasecrets2018gruber.eventbrite.com/

Dr. Gruber’s research pertains to biofluorescence, bioluminescence, coral reef biology and symbiosis. He utilizes Next-Generation genomic sequencing, novel soft robotics and low-light imaging platforms to investigate deep marine life in the most non-invasive means possible. Gruber has developed a “Shark-Eye” camera to gain a shark’s perspective of their marine environment and is extending this visual theme to include other marine animals. He will also discuss his recent work that aims to decipher the light-language of flashlight fish. He and his collaborators have discovered scores of novel biofluorescent compounds from marine animals. Several of these compounds have been deployed as tools to study cancer drugs and to understand the brain.

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About the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School
The University of Miami is one of the largest private research institutions in the southeastern United States. The University’s mission is to provide quality education, attract and retain outstanding students, support the faculty and their research, and build an endowment for University initiatives. Founded in the 1940’s, the Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science has grown into one of the world’s premier marine and atmospheric research institutions. Offering dynamic interdisciplinary academics, the Rosenstiel School is dedicated to helping communities to better understand the planet, participating in the establishment of environmental policies, and aiding in the improvement of society and quality of life. For more information, visit: www.rsmas.miami.edu.

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