Honors and Awards

Editor-in-Chief Nick Shay

Rosenstiel School Professor Dr. Nick Shay

Rosenstiel School Professor Dr. Nick Shay

Rosenstiel School Professor Lynn “Nick” Shay will take on the role of Editor-in-Chief of the Elsevier journal Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans this July.

Shay, a professor in the Department of Ocean Sciences at the UM Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, has been an active member of the Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans Editorial Board for a number of years.

His research interests include experimental and theoretical investigations of the ocean response and coupled air-sea

interactions during hurricanes, airborne oceanographic profiling of upper ocean variability, coastal oceanographic process studies, and high frequency (HF) and satellite radar remote sensing to examine the linkages between surface signatures and upper ocean structure. He has authored over ninety peer-reviewed manuscripts and book chapters and has chaired or served on thirty student committees.

He serves on various panels and committees: Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association Board of Directors; National Federation of Regional Association National HF Radar Steering Team; NSF and NOAA Hurricanes at Landfall Co-chair; NOAA Hurricane Forecast Improvement Project Observing and Coupled Modeling Teams; Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System-Regional Association Observations Committee; and the NASA Hurricane Science Team. Internationally, he has been the Oceanic Impacts and Air-Sea Interaction rapporteur for the World Meteorological Organization’s (WMO) International Workshop for Tropical Cyclones; panel member of the WMO Landfall Processes; and HFR Oceanography Workshops.

He is also a Fellow of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) and was part of a NASA Group Achievement Award for his work with satellite altimetry during the Genesis and Rapid Intensity (GRIP) Program conducted in the fall of 2010.

Teaching Assistant Excellence Award Winners

RSMAS campusCongratulations to the 2013-14 Rosenstiel School Teaching Assistant (TA) Excellence Award Winners!

Undergraduate Lecture: Stacy Aguilera

Undergraduate Lab: I-Kuan Hu

Graduate Course: Bruce Pholot

“There were many nominees for these awards this year, and the competition was tough,” said Amy Clement, Rosenstiel School professor and associate dean for graduate studies. “Thanks to all the TAs and faculty for the hard work. We look forward to continuing to make it a very valuable experience for all involved in the coming years!”

Alumni News

Rosenstiel School alumna Dr. Linda Duguay

Rosenstiel School alumna Dr. Linda Duguay

Rosenstiel School alumna Linda Duguay has been elected president of the Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO), the largest international organization devoted to the aquatic sciences. She has been elected for the 2016-2018 term.

Duguay received her M.S. degree in 1973 from the Rosenstiel School where she focused her studies on the ecology of the ctenophore Mnemiopsis mccradyi in Biscayne Bay followed by a Ph.D. in Biological Oceanography for her research on calcium metabolism and photosynthetic carbon fixation in benthic Foraminifera symbiotic with microalgae.

Duguay is director of the University of Southern California (USC) Sea Grant Program and director of research for the Wrigley Institute for Environmental Studies at USC.

 

What Caused the Rapid Intensification of Super Typhoon Haiyan?

Typhoon Haiyan at peak intensity on November 7, 2013. Credit: NASA

Typhoon Haiyan at peak intensity on November 7, 2013. Credit: NASA

During the AMS Hurricane and Tropical Meteorology meeting in San Diego last week, Rosenstiel School professor Nick Shay presented research on the role ocean warming played in the rapid intensification of last year’s devastating Super Typhoon Haiyan in Southeast Asia.

Shay’s study suggests that temperature fluctuations from semi-diurnal internal tides need to be analyzed to fully understand the causes of rapid intensification as the storm went over the warm pool of water in the western Pacific prior to landfall in the Philippines.

Using temperature, salinity and current data collected as Haiyan made a direct hit over the Japan’s Triton buoy (formerly a NOAA TAO buoy), along with satellite-derived data from the SPORTS climatology model (Systematically merged Pacific Ocean Temperature and Salinity developed by Rosenstiel School graduate student Claire McCaskill), Shay’s research team examined ocean warming conditions prior to Haiyan at the thermocline, a distinct ocean temperature layer that is known to fluctuate seasonally due to tides and currents.

 

infrared satellite loop of Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines. Credit: NOAA

infrared satellite loop of Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines. Credit: NOAA

Internal tides are known to create large temperature fluctuations. Shay suggests that the upper ocean heat content was important in the rapid intensification of Haiyan similar to what is observed in the Atlantic Ocean basin. While the semidiurnal tides were amplified in the warming thermocline in this regime, they have to be removed from the data to accurately evaluate questions related to the roles climate change and oceanic warming played in the storm’s intensification.

Nick Shay ‘In a Spin’ Talking about Hurricanes & The Loop Current

 Nick ShayInternational Innovation, a top blog for the dissemination of scientific information in Europe featured an article on UM Rosenstiel School Prof. and AMS Fellow Lynn ‘Nick’ Shay. In it, he speaks about his research, scientific achievements, and challenges in the field. Check out the pdf!  Shay_Research_Media_2013_OHC