2013 Sea Secrets Lecture Series – Mark Your Calendar for the Season!

Screen shot 2013-01-10 at 3.06.34 PMThe Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science and the Ocean Research and Education Foundation have teamed up once again to host distinguished scientists and explorers as part of the 2013 Sea Secrets lecture series.  The events are free and open to the public. Programs take place in the Rosenstiel School Auditorium, 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway on Virginia Key, Fla. beginning with a reception at 5:30 p.m., followed by the lecture at 6:00 p.m.

 

Wednesday, January 16, 2013
BIMINI HOAX: THE TRUTH ABOUT ATLANTIS
Eugene A. Shinn, Professor, University of South Florida College of Marine Science & UM Alumnus

The mysterious rock megaliths off the island of Bimini in The Bahamas have interested geologists and New Age thinkers for more than 50 years. Some believe the stones are remnants of the lost city of Atlantis, while geologist have alternative ideas. Geologist Gene Shinn has been involved in the heated controversy over these megaliths since the 1970s when he headed up the US Geological Survey field station on Fisher Island. Gene majored in biology on a music scholarship at the University of Miami, while at the same time becoming a national spearfishing champion, underwater-explosives expert and photographer. His dynamic presentation will illustrate why New Agers feel so strongly about the megaliths origin. The adventure is also described in his upcoming memoir, Bootstrap Geologist.

Wednesday, February 13, 2013
RATIONAL COMEDY FOR AN IRRATIONAL PLANET
Brian Malow, Earth’s Premier Science Humorist (self-proclaimed)

Plunge into marine science with comedian Brian Malow.  From coral reefs to the Marianas Trench, plankton to whales, photosynthesis to climate change, he will discover the lighter side and bring it to the surface. Malow has been featured in Nature, The Washington Post, and The New York Times, and in programs such as The Late, Late Show with Craig Ferguson and NPR’s Science Friday with Ira Flatow. He has also performed to rave reviews for NASA, JPL, NIST, NSF, AAAS – and many other acronyms.  He creates science videos for Time Magazine’s website and is a contributor to Neil deGrasse Tyson’s radio show.  Currently working in science communications at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, Malow is widely acclaimed for his workshops and presentations which help train scientists to become better speakers.

Wednesday, March 13, 2013
THE HUMAN FACTOR: OUR IMPACT ON EARTH’S FINAL FRONTIER
Charles Fisher, Professor of Biology, Pennsylvania State University

Considered by many to be the planet’s final frontier for exploration, the deep sea is home to a wealth of mineral, oil and gas deposits that mankind’s ever- increasing population will need in the future. Biologist Chuck Fisher has been studying the communities that live around natural oil and gas seeps in the deep Gulf of Mexico, and those that live on deep sea hydrothermal vents since their discovery about 30 years ago. This pioneer in the field is an expert on the amazing evolutionary adaptations of giant tubeworms and other strange animals to the extreme, often toxic environments of undersea volcanoes and oil seeps. With the first deep sea mining of hydrothermal vents scheduled for 2013, and drilling in the Gulf moving into deeper and deeper water, much of Fisher’s research is now addressing the ecology of these poorly known communities and their resiliency to human impacts.

Wednesday, April 17, 2013
CHOREOGRAPHING OCEAN CONSERVATION
Tierney Thys, National Geographic Explorer

We need to tap all of our creative talents to help conserve our vital ocean resources. With this in mind, National Geographic Explorer, Tierney Thys, works closely with photographers, dancers, filmmakers, gamers and other artists to help infuse quality science and conservation messaging into their work. In addition to conducting her own research on the giant ocean sunfish Mola mola, this scientist and ocean conservationist is: the writer/ producer for Stories from the Sea–an award-winning TEDed web series; the lead science advisor for the renowned dance troupe, Capacitor’s, Okeanos Project and; Daily Explorer in AnimalJam.com, an online world for 6-9 year olds with 6 million registered players. She served as Director of Research for the acclaimed Strange Days on Planet Earth PBS documentary series on global environmental change. In this media rich presentation, this TED braintrust member will present examples of what has and hasn’t worked, and discuss the value of reaching both the heart and mind to move conservation issues forward.

Winners of the University of Miami’s 2013 Underwater Photography Contest will be announced after the lecture and winning images will be on display at the Rosenstiel School library.
Wednesday, May 8, 2013
DUST, CLOUDS AND CLIMATE:  WHAT WE CAN’T SEE CAN HURT US
Amy Clement, Professor of Meteorology & Physical Oceanography at UM

Gases, cloud droplets and dust exist all around us. This often-invisible ‘stuff’ in the atmosphere plays a major role in driving changes to our climate. The greenhouse gas carbon dioxide, for example, has a well-known warming effect on the climate and will continue to raise the planet’s temperature for the foreseeable future. Cloud and dust particles reflect and absorb radiation, which can alter the rate of climate change, but there are large uncertainties in how dust and clouds will change in the future. The implications are global, but they can have major consequences for life here in South Florida by affecting how fast the sea level rises. Award-winning climate scientist Dr. Amy Clement will discuss the current state-of-the-art science that is focused on studying these gases and particles, how we detect them and most importantly, how we can evaluate their impacts.

NOTE: This year the series will offer attendees the opportunity to become a Sea Secrets VIP when they reserve a seat for the entire season. $500 for two seats or $300 for one seat will guarantee premium seating, plus a personalized plaque on an auditorium seat and a VIP dinner. Donations go toward the renovation of the Auditorium and are tax-deductible. For more information, please contact Susan Gerrish at sgerrish@rsmas.miami.edu.

Sea Secrets is sponsored by The Shepard Broad Foundation, The Charles N. and Eleanor Knight Leigh Foundation and Southern Wine & Spirits, and organized by UM Professor Emeritus Robert N. Ginsburg.