Outstanding Mentor & Student Award Winners

UM Rosenstiel Professor Roland Romeiser of the Department of Ocean Sciences is the winner of the 2017 Outstanding Mentor Award. This annual award is meant to recognize faculty and staff members who go above and beyond in fostering the professional and personal development of RSMAS graduate students. The award is based solely on student recommendations and nominations were evaluated by a committee made up of student representatives and the previous year’s recipient.

David Ortiz-Suslow (left) and 2017 Outstanding Mentor award recipient Roland Romeiser

According to Dave Ortiz-Suslow, chair of the student SLED committee that choose this year’s winner, “Dr. Romeiser is described as having a profound interest in the well-being of OCE graduate students. He is an excellent instructor, accomplished researcher, and outstanding mentor to many students, not only the ones he directly advises.”

The SLED committee also recognized Professor Elizabeth Babcock of the Department of Marine Biology and Ecology as this year’s Honorable Mention. Dr. Babcock is an excellent mentor who works ardently to encourage students’ professional development at and beyond RSMAS.

Student Awards

On Friday, April 28 an award ceremony was held honoring all UM Rosenstiel student accomplishments during the past year.

Spring 2017 Student Award Winners

Photos of the 2017 awards ceremony can be accessed here: https://www.facebook.com/pg/RosenstielSchool/photos/?tab=album&album_id=10154576154375949

Best Ph.D. Dissertation – F.G. Walton Smith Prize
Dr. Sarah Larson (MPO)

Best Student Publication – Millero Prize
Jara Schnyder (MGG)

Mary Roche Endowed Fellowship 
Mariana Bernardi-Bif (OCE)

Koczy Fellowship
Kevin Schauer (MBE)

Masters of Professional Science for Excellence in Ocean Stewardship
Ana Nader Valenci (MPS)
Jeff Palumbo (MPS)

Graduate Studies Service Award
Samantha Dowdell (MAF)
Meredith Jennings (MAC)
David Ortiz-Suslow (AMP)

Teaching Assistant Excellence Award
Zachary Daugherty (MES)
Sharmila Giri (MGG)
Jacob Jerome (MAF)

Career Development Fund
Ryan Kramer (MPO) and Eleanor Middlemas (MPO)
Michael Connelly (MBE)
Shane Hinton (MPS)
Amanda Mikalian (MPS)
Heather Sadusky (MPS)
Joletta Silva (MPS)
Jennifer Simms (MPS)

David Rowland Endowed Fellowship
Molly Amador (MBE)
Ana Palacio-Castro (MBF)

International Light Tackle Tournament Fund
Lela Schlenker (MBF)
Christina Pasparakis (MBE)
Heather Sadusky (MPS)

Best MPO Student Seminar Award
Ryan Kramer (MPO)

Best Abstract OCE Student Seminars
Romain Chaput (OCE)

OCE/AMP/MAC Best Student Seminar 

Dave Ortiz-Suslow (OCE)

 

Congratulations to our spring award winners and a special thanks to the Graduate Academic Committee for carefully reviewing and selecting the winners from a very strong group of nominations.

 

 

Awards and Accolades

Outstanding Mentor Award
Danielle McDonaldUM Rosenstiel School Professor Danielle McDonald is the 2016 recipient of the Outstanding Mentor Award. In its third inauguration, this award is meant to recognize outstanding mentors who go above and beyond in fostering the professional and personal development of RSMAS graduate students. This award is based on student nominations.

McDonald was described as an “engaging researcher and educator who demonstrates a vested interest in her students’ success and personal well-being.”

An associate professor of marine biology and ecology, McDonald directs the UM Toadfish Lab.  She combines whole animal physiology, molecular biology, pharmacology and toxicology research to study the interactions between serotonin (5-HT), its receptors and transporters and the stress hormone, cortisol, as toadfish have a unique physiological process, pulsatile urea excretion, that involves all these components. Her work has toxicological as well as human health relevance as it gives some insight on the impact of chronic antidepressant administration, which has many negative side effects in humans.

 

Graduate Student Receives NASA Fellowship

Ryan KramerUM Rosenstiel School graduate student Ryan Kramer was awarded the NASA Earth and Space Science (NESSF) Fellowship for research in the area of Earth Science. Kramer was one of 73 Earth Science fellows to receive the award, which provides a maximum award of $30,000 for one year, with two more potential years of funding.

Kramer, a PhD student in the UM Rosenstiel School Atmospheric Sciences Program, was awarded for his proposal “Understanding Radiative Feedbacks and Radiative Forcings of the Hydrological Cycle.”

The purpose of the NESSF is to ensure continued training of a highly qualified workforce in disciplines required to achieve NASA’s scientific goals. Awards resulting from the competitive selection are made in the form of training grants to the respective universities and educational institutions, with the faculty advisor serving as the principal investigator.

“I’m extremely honored to receive this Fellowship,” said Kramer. “It will provide me significant freedom to continue my research on the earth’s hydrological cycle as effectively as possible, and will help me build a valuable connection to NASA and their incredible resources.  There is such great work being done at RSMAS, and I am proud to represent the School in some small way.”

Awards for Excellence 

Congratulations to the winners of the 2016 UM Graduate Student Association and TA Excellence Awards:

UM Graduate Student Association Awardees

* Sean Kennelly was awarded the Linda Sher-Collado Memorial Staff Appreciation Award.
* Anna Ling was awarded the GSA Academic Excellence, Leadership, and Service Award.

TA Excellence Awardees

* Zack Daugherty for MSC 328: Introduction to Aquaculture
* Sharmila Giri for MSC 232: Introduction to Marine Biology Laboratory
* Jake Jerome for MSC 460: Spatial Applications for Marine Science

Faculty News

Lisa Beal, UM Rosenstiel School professor of ocean science, was appointed honorary research associate at the University of Cape Town in South Africa.

She was appointed in recognition of her career-long focus on the oceans around South Africa and her ongoing collaborations with South African colleagues to develop capacity for sustained measurements in the Agulhas Current as part of the Global Ocean Observing System.

Beal recently taught in the oceanography honors program at the university.

Beal

Beal with her honors class.

 

Summer Course in Water Resources: VietNam and China

Nine students from the University of Miami participated in a month-long UM course on “Water Resources: Science, Law, and Policy” in VietNam and China from 17 May to 12 June 2015. The course, cross-listed by the UM School of Law and the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS) was organized by Professor Daniel Suman. The students specialized in environmental law and the environmental science and policy at both the graduate and undergraduate levels.  Students spent two weeks in VietNam before traveling to Yunnan Province, China where they studied for weeks three and four of the course.

Suman-summercourse2015

In VietNam, course discussions were held in two universities: Hanoi University of Natural Resources and Environment (HUNRE) and the Hanoi University of Mining and Geology (HUMG). UM students were joined by some 20 students from both universities during lectures, discussions, field trips, and social activities. Topics covered included Water Resouce Management in VietNam, Mangroves and Wetlands in Vietnam, Drinking Water and Wastewater Management, Water and Sustainable Cities, Vietnam´s Law of the Environment, Public Perception of Water Resources in Vietnam, and Groundwater Management in VietNam. In addition to meetings at the universities, the group traveled to Halong Bay Marine Protected Area, Cat Ba National Park, and the Sapa region in the mountainous area on the VietNam-China border.

suman-summercourse2015

During the second half of the course, the group visited the Asian International Rivers Center (AIRC) and Yunnan University in Kunming, China from 1-12 June. The Miami students were joined by 8 graduate students from AIRC. During their visit to the Yunnan University campus, AIRC Professors and Suman offered lectures on such topics as China´s transboundary rivers, management of water resources in China, wetlands in China and their management, wetland ecosystem services and the management of wetlands in the USA, the environmental impact assessment process in China, the United Nations Convention on the Law of Non-Navigable Uses of International Watercourses, and environmental impacts of mining. In addition to the week of presentations and discussions at AIRC, the students also visited numerous natural sites in Yunnan Province – including ShiLin Stone Forest Geological Park, Lake Dianchi and the Panlong River, Western Hills National Park, Dali and the Cangshan Mountain National Park, and Shaxi and Shibaoshan Mountain. One of the highlights of the course was a three day trek through the Tiger Leaping Gorge of the Yangtze River.

Suman-summercourse2015

This is the seventh year that the UM has offered this summer course in VietNam and China. It has provided opportunities for sharing of concepts and knowledge about water resources to young professionals from the three countries, as well as long-lasting friendships between students and staff from UM and sister institutions in VietNam and China.

— Daniel Suman, professor of marine ecosystems & society at the UM Rosenstiel School

World Oceans Day: Thought Leaders

UM Rosenstiel School faculty provide their insight on the oceans.

Dennis Hansell, Chair and Professor, Department of Ocean Sciences

Dennis Hansell“Think of the ocean as you would the blood coursing through our bodies.  It offers connectivity to all corners, leaving no part in isolation.  It carries life-supporting oxygen, nutrients and energy to its greatest and darkest depths.  It exchanges that oxygen and greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide with the atmosphere above it, keeping both the terrestrial and marine biospheres healthy and stable.  It moves heat from where it is in excess to those much colder zones, maintaining the narrow thermal stability required for life that would otherwise be diminished.  Just as understanding the physical, chemical and biological dynamics of a healthy circulatory system within our bodies is central to medical science, ocean scientists seek to understand those dimensions of the global oceans’ metabolism.  As with the living body, it is a wondrous and beautiful system, its core functions are often hidden and thus incompletely known, and its health is conditioned by our treatment of it.”

 

Benjamin Kirtman, Professor, Department of Atmospheric Sciences

Ben Kirtman“The health of our planet and all of its ecosystems (humans, animals, fish, plants …) critically depend on what is happening in the ocean today. Indeed, current threats to food and water security and the associate famine and drought can be directly related to ocean processes. We are concerned about the health of the planet because ocean temperatures (in the upper 75 m) consistently have risen 1.5F since 1950 and sea-ice concentrations have decreased at record rates so that it is now expected that we will have a nearly ice free Arctic summer in ten years. 95% of all ice sheets are declining and global sea level has risen over half a foot since 1950. All of these unprecedented changes indicate that the climate system and the entire health of the planet is out of balance, and this comes with changes that will significantly challenge all of our ecosystems.”

 

Claire Paris, Associate Professor, Department of Ocean Sciences

Claire Paris“Most marine species, whether they are reef building corals or bluefin tuna, spend the early stages of their life as tiny plankton, navigating the world oceans. To know where they are, where they need to swim, and to avoid predation, these minute larvae are adapted to detect ocean signals, such as sounds, odor, or even celestial and magnetic cues. One of the last frontiers resides in the study of the mysterious world of larvae and the small-scale physical-biological interactions. It is important to understand how the “critical” pelagic phase of so many marine species endure such a challenging odyssey. The ocean is their nursery.  If we care for our oceans to reduce the pollution that affects the cues, we will protect the small things and everything else will thrive.”

Neil Hammerschlag, Research Assistant Professor, Department of Marine Ecosystems and Society

Neil“Over the past 50 years, we have learned more about our oceans, estuaries, rivers and lakes than ever before, while at the same time degrading, overfishing and destroying these vital systems. Every year, over 1.5 billion hooks are set in the ocean to commercially target large pelagic predators including tunas and billfish, catching and killing them faster than they can reproduce resulting in drastic worldwide declines of many species. With changes in global climate, the chemistry of our oceans is changing and corals are bleaching. Not only is the mystery and beauty of these systems and species being lost, but also their functions within the ecosystem. The web of life that sustains us is deteriorating. To aid in understanding and addressing these issues, we are conducting a variety of innovative research projects in collaboration with various University and community partners.”

 

Faculty Profile: Dr. Claire Paris

As an ocean scientist at the UM Rosenstiel School, Claire Paris spends days observing the movements of tiny fish larvae in a unique underwater drifting laboratory. She has developed scientific instruments to listen to, and observe these important, but often unnoticed, life forms on the reefs and in the open ocean. Another powerful component to her scientific approach is how she interacts with her research subjects underwater. Paris uses her talent as a certified freediver to minimize any human disturbance to her research subjects.

Claire Paris

Claire Paris

“The bubbles from SCUBA disturbs the pelagic environment,” said Paris, a native of South France who spent a lot of time in the ocean as a child. “Freediving makes you feel one with the environment and promotes a sense of peace and fulfillment.”

Paris, a Rosenstiel School alumna (M.S. ’87), is at the top of her game, both as a scientist and freediver. She has led numerous groundbreaking studies, including one that showed that reef fish larvae can smell the presence of coral reefs from as far as several kilometers offshore, and use this odor to find their way home. She also found that fish larvae communicate by emitting sounds.

She has developed unique scientific instruments and sophisticated computer models to predict how fish larvae, as well other planktonic organisms and pollutants are transported with the ocean currents. These tools were instrumental to help track the behavior of oil during the Deepwater Horizon blowout, and continue to be used to simulate the fate of oil, to predict oil spill impacts and to optimize the first response to future spills.

US Freediving Association Team

US Freediving Association Team

She is a member of the United States Freediving Association (USFA) and an AIDA* International-ranked freediver and was selected for Team USA for the Team World Championships in 2014 and for the Individuals World Championships in 2015. She holds a Performance Freediving International (PFI) certification. Claire’s goal is to promote AAUS (American Academy of Underwater Science) scientific freediving nation-wide with the UM Rosenstiel School as a frontrunner.

Finding her potential and having no fear to dive deeper makes her a better scientist, says Paris.

*AIDA: Association Internationale pour le Development de l’Apnee