UM professor co-authors influential climate change paper

Professor Brian Soden

Professor Brian Soden

Professor Brian Soden’s 2006 paper is “one of most influential climate change papers of all time.

The Carbon Brief recently asked climate experts what they think are the most influential papers. In joint second place was a paper by Isaac Held (NOAA) and UM Rosenstiel School’s Professor of Atmospheric Sciences Brian Soden published in the Journal of Climate in 2006.

The paper, “Robust Responses of the Hydrological Cycle to Global Warming,” identified how rainfall from one place to another would be affected by climate change. Prof Sherwood, who nominated this paper, tells Carbon Brief why it represented an important step forward. He says:

“[This paper] advanced what is known as the “wet-get-wetter, dry-get-drier” paradigm for precipitation in global warming. This mantra has been widely misunderstood and misapplied, but was the first and perhaps still the only systematic conclusion about regional precipitation and global warming based on robust physical understanding of the atmosphere.”

The Carbon Brief reports on the latest developments and media coverage of climate science and energy policy, with a particular focus on the UK. They produce news coverage, analysis and factchecks. Read more

Aquaculture, alumni, and more…

The Future of Aquaculture

Juvenile Mahi-Mahi

Juvenile Mahi-Mahi

UM Rosenstiel School Professor of Marine Ecosystems and Society Daniel Benetti published an essay on the future of aquaculture in the current issue of The Journal of Ocean Technology.

“In the field of aquaculture, technology has evolved at an enormous pace during the last two decades. Advances in technology are allowing all of us involved in the field, from scientists to operators, to address and tackle most, if not all, contentious issues in aquaculture.”

“Modern aquaculture relies on advanced technologies to produce wholesome seafood for human consumption. Indeed, aquaculture has become as important as farming and agriculture, currently contributing over 50% of wholesome seafood for human consumption worldwide. Aquaculture production continues to increase exponentially and is the fastest growing food production sector, having surpassed beef production in 2012-13 (66 million metric tons vs. 63 million metric tons). “

Read Dr. Benetti’s article in the JOT issue titled “Changing Tides in Ocean Technology,” (Volume 9 Number 2 (Jul. – Oct. 2014), An electronic subscription is required for full access to the issue.

Award-winning Student

MPO student Jie He

Jie He

UM Rosenstiel School Ph.D student Jie He was recently awarded “Outstanding Presentation for Students and Early Career Scientists” at the 7th International Scientific Conference on the Global Water and Energy Cycle, which took place in the Hague, Netherlands in July 2014. He is a Meteorology and Physical Oceanography  student studying the role of sea surface temperature pattern change in a warming climate in  Professor Brian Soden’s lab.

 

Alumnus Appoint President of Penn State University

Eric  J. Barron

Eric J. Barron

UM Rosenstiel School alumnus Eric Barron recently took the helm as president of Penn State University. Barron received his Master of Science (’76) and Ph.D (’80) in oceanography from the UM Rosenstiel School. In addition, he spent one year as an associate professor at UM before taking up a new post at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado.

Barron has a distinguished resume, as the former President of Florida State University he lead the university’s rise to a U.S. News & World Report ranking as the most efficiently operated university in the nation. His expertise in the areas of climate, environmental change and oceanography, among other earth science topics, have led to extensive service for the federal government and the international community. Read more on about Penn State’s new president here.