Tools for Success

The STEM field has become increasingly popular and important in the past few years. Encouraging grade school students to participate in STEM activities have been shown to make an impact in their chances of high school graduation and being accepted into college. In fact, one program has seen first-hand what a difference STEM immersion can do for a student.

One program that has made an incredible impact on high school students since its inception in 1999, has been the Frost Science Upward Bound Math and Science program (UBMS), funded by the U.S. Department of Education. UBMS understands the importance of science in the classroom, but has also realized that under-resourced students often miss out on a science focused curriculum in school as well as lacking science role models in their lives. To defeat this problem, the UBMS program enlists students from Title 1 schools within the M-DCPS district and enrolls them in a four year, after school, weekend and summer program geared towards STEM curiosity. The program inspires these under-resourced students the opportunity to see a world of post-secondary study, motivating them to complete high school and become the first generation in their family to be accepted into college.

The UBMS program provides these students with access to mentors, interactions with scientists and technology as well as a six-week summer program called IMPACT (Integrated Marine Program and College Training). In partnership with the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, these students are able to immerse themselves with marine science curriculum through activities with the university such as shark tagging expeditions, outdoor field experiences and field trips to state parks and marine sanctuaries and conduct research projects mentored by graduate students and M-DCPS teachers.

IMPACT Program student cuts a piece of a Nurse shark’s dorsal fin for analysis back at the lab.

 

The IMPACT curriculum always includes the theory, practice and tools associated with different subjects ranging from oceanography, marine biology, geology, and ecology, meteorology and resource management. At the end of their six-week summer program, the students are given the opportunity to present their projects and are recognized by museum staff, scientists, families and peers for their dedicated accomplishments.

This summer, I was given the opportunity to present and give a lecture to these students during their six-week IMPACT program at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. As a current Rosenstiel School graduate student, I am fulfilling my internship requirement under the direction of Research Professor Vassiliki Kourafalou in the Department of Ocean Sciences, who is currently doing research with funding from the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI)  which is a “10-year independent research program created to study the effect, and the potential associated impact, of hydrocarbon releases on the environment and public health, as well as to develop improved spill mitigation, oil detection, characterization and remediation technologies” (Gulf of Mexico Research Intiative 2013). In easier words, to understand the effects of oil on the environment and how to be better prepared in case another oil spill like the Deepwater Horizon explosion were to happen again. During my internship, I spent most of my time researching and understanding the work related to the GoMRI project, created lectures and presentations for high school classrooms and attended outreach events. I felt really lucky to be given the opportunity to present to these IMPACT students, because coming from a previous career as a high school biology teacher, I understand the importance of communicating science to young people, while making them interested in it at the same time. To be invited by the outreach coordinators at IMPACT and asked to be a small part of an amazing program like UBMS, was extremely gratifying. Knowing I made a positive impact on these students is a feeling that every teacher, volunteer, outreach coordinator, mom, dad, whoever it may be, wants to feel and experience.

Amanda De Cun provides an overview of oil-spill science to IMPACT Program students

With over 1,000 students participating in their program since 1999, 98% have graduated high school and 95% have been accepted into a post-secondary institution of study, with the majority pursuing STEM fields (UBMS 2017). The UBMS program has made it extremely clear that when you provide students with the necessary tools to succeed, they will, in fact succeed.

 

 

 

Works Cited

  1. Gulf of Mexico Research Intiative . http://gulfresearchinitiative.org/.
  2. UBMS. https://www.frostscience.org/project/ubms/.

 

Submitted by:

Amanda I. De Cun, MPS Candidate Marine Ecosystems and Society Intern, Department of Ocean Sciences

 This story was previously published by:

Miami Today Newspaper; August 17, 2017, pg.6

Florida Citizens for Science, website and social media accounts; July 2017

Rosenstiel School Ocean Modeling Website; July 2017

Rosenstiel School MPS Facebook; July 2017

 

 

 

 

RECOVER Launches New Website

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The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI) consortium RECOVER recently launched their new website at www.miami.edu/recover. It will act as a centralized hub for information regarding the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science led consortium focusing on the effects of crude oil on fish. Visitors to the site can expect to learn about new findings, classroom and virtual learning activities, hatchery tour information, and videos relative to the ongoing work.

Watch an introduction video to the RECOVER project.

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RECOVER (Relationship of Effects of Cardiac Outcomes in fish for Validation of Ecological Risk) is a consortium comprised of seven researchers from four institutions. Led by Professor Martin Grosell, the team is studying the impacts and toxic effects of crude oil on ecologically and commercially important fish from the Gulf of Mexico. Two species that are currently being examined are the pelagic mahi-mahi and the coastal redfish. Studies will range from molecular, cellular, organ level and whole animal physiologic as well as behavior analyses at different life stages. Previous findings by team members have already shown that fish embryos and larvae exposed to crude oil during early development results in malformation of hearts, resulting in mortality or reduced cardiac and swimming performance in surviving individuals.

To learn more about RECOVER and their current findings please visit www.miami.edu/recover and follow them on social media.

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Dan DiNicola

RECOVER Outreach Coordinator

CARTHE, Waterlust Team Wins Top Prize in Video Challenge

A team of scientists and filmmakers at the Rosenstiel School won top prize in the Ocean 180 Challenge for their video “Drones on the Beach” and placed in the top 10 for their video about ocean currents, “Bob the Drifter.”

Watch the award-winning video:

To read the corresponding science publication on drone technology used in oil spill research, click here.

The videos were created by the Waterlust team, which includes Ph.D. student Patrick Rynne and alumna Fiona Graham and Jennah Caster. Both videos were based on CARTHE ((Consortium for Advanced Research on the Transport of Hydrocarbon in the Environment) research. CARTHE is a Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative consortia based at the Rosenstiel School.

37,795 middle school students judges in over 1,600 classrooms in 21 countries selected the top entries. These students were responsible for critiquing and evaluating the finalists based on their creativity, message, and educational value.

Watch “Bob the Drifter”

The Florida Center for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (COSEE Florida) hosts the annual Ocean 180 Video Challenge, which aims to engage non-scientists and students in timely and relevant ocean science research while inspiring scientists to effectively share their discoveries and excitement for research with the public. For more on the Ocean 180 video Challenge, click here.

CARTHE, Waterlust team

CARTHE, Waterlust team

Exploring Marine Science Day 2014

Saturday October 25, 2014 marked the 12th anniversary of the Exploring Marine Science Day for middle school girls. The Consortium for Advanced Research on the Transport of Hydrocarbon in the Environment (CARTHE) partnered with the UM Rosenstiel School and the American Association of University Women (AAUW) to host this day of interactive learning. Fifty young women from across South Florida spent their Saturday with Rosenstiel’s female faculty, students, and researchers to get an up close look at what it is like to be a marine scientist.

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  • The girls learned about corals with Stephanie Schopmeyer and helped with coral restoration by planting coral (skeleton) fragments on special nursery plantforms.
  • The amazing women from Marine Geosciences never disappoint! Amel Saied, Anna Ling, Kim Galvez, and Carolina Bardaro taught the girls how to squeeze water from mud samples and they explored some of the amazing organisms found in the ocean.
  • The highlight of the day is always drawing blood from a toadfish with Dr. Danielle McDonald and her students. They learned about red and white blood cells, plasma, and stress hormones.
  • Rana Fine taught the girls about ocean acidification through an experiment in which the girls test the pH of sea water, before and after the addition of a carbonated soda.
  • Aplysia! CARTHE Outreach Manager Laura Bracken taught the girls about the importance of the amazing aplysia and the fascinating details of their life cycle, but the best part was actually getting to hold their slimy new friend.
  • The girls learned about density during a colorful experiment, mixing salt and freshwater with Meredith Jennings and Renellys Perez.
  • Josefina Olascoaga created a spinning ocean in the lab, complete with dyed ocean currents and eddies!
  • Dr. Lisa Beal completed the day with a powerful video of female oceanographers and a reminder to all of us, “Don’t let the boys have all the fun!”

Attendees had this to say about the event:

“Today’s program was awesome! I did not know there was so much science out in the ocean…”
“I love science and everything I did today was amazing”

“Today was one of the best days of my life!”

“I learned that there was a lot more to marine science than I thought.”

The activities are clearly fun and engaging but most importantly the girls left with a greater interest in science and knowing that anyone can be a scientist. Our scientists are also athletes, mothers, community leaders, and artists. According to the evaluations, the majority has an increased interest in studying science!

Thank you to all of the volunteers from CARTHE, RSMAS, and AAUW for making this day a success.

— Laura Bracken

Faculty and Student Honors & Awards

Professor Eberli Receives Distinguished Educator Award

UM Rosenstiel School Professor of Marine Geology and Geophysics Gregor Eberli is the recipient of the 2014 American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) Grover E. Murray Memorial Distinguished Educator Award “for being a superb teacher and mentor to young geoscientists and an educator to the industry and for his insightful and scholarly publications.”

UM Rosenstiel School Professor Gregor Eberli

UM Rosenstiel School Professor Gregor Eberli

A native of Switzerland, Dr. Eberli received his doctorate from the Swiss Institute of Technology (ETH) Zürich in 1985. In 1991 he joined the faculty of the UM Rosenstiel School, where he has been a principal advisor to over 20 doctoral and masters students and 12 post-doctoral students, as well as being associated with numerous other students through his teaching and as a research advisor. He is currently director of the CSL – Center for Carbonate Research, an association between oil companies and the University of Miami, which has been a model copied by numerous other universities. The mission of the Center is to conduct fundamental research in carbonates and to disseminate the results of this integrated research not only through academic journals but also directly to geoscientists working in companies.

Together with colleagues he leads high-quality field trips and short courses to industry geologists and engineers working for various companies from around the world. He co-led an AAPG Field Seminar to Great Bahama Bank for over a decade; the seminar is still run through the University of Miami and since its inception nearly 400 industry “students” have been introduced to carbonates with a major focus on stratigraphy and heterogeneity issues in carbonate reservoirs. He has been a distinguished lecturer for AAPG in 1996/97, JOI/USSAC in 1998/99, and the European Association of Geoscientists and Engineers in 2005-2006.

The AAPG Grover E. Murray Memorial Distinguished Educator Award is given in recognition of distinguished and outstanding contributions to geological education, including the teaching and counseling of students at the university level, and contributions to the education of the public, and management of educational programs. The award is presented at the AAPG annual meeting.

2013 Delcroix Prize in Oceans and Human Health

UM Rosenstiel School Professor Emerita Lora Fleming has been awarded the 2013 Delcroix Prize for her outstanding research in the field of oceans and human health.The prize will be awarded in Oostende, Belgium in June 2014, including a presentation from the laureate on her prize-winning research.

UM Professor Emerita Lora Fleming

UM Professor Emerita Lora Fleming

Prior to retiring from UM and joining the European Centre for Environment and Human Health at the University of Exeter, Fleming held a joint appointment at the UM Rosenstiel School and the UM Medical School and was co-director of the NSF-NIEHS Oceans and Human Health Center. She has created outreach and educational materials on the human health effects of marine and freshwater natural toxins, and performed research in Ciguatera Fish Poisoning, Florida Red Tides (Brevetoxins) and cyanobacterial toxins.

The Dr. Edouard Delcroix Prize is an international scientific prize awarded to a researcher or a research team for a scientific study on the links between oceans and human health. The prize was established in honor of Dr. Edouard Delcroix (1891-1973), Belgian orthopaedic surgeon and pioneer in thalassotherapy.

Rosenstiel School Student Goldwater Scholarship Honorable Mention

Joaquin Nunez received Honorable Mention from the Goldwater Scholarship Selection Committee. Nunez transferred to the Marine Science/Biology program in the Rosenstiel School in fall 2013, after earning an Associate’s degree in biology from Miami-Dade College – where he was involved with the National Science Foundation-funded STEM FYE program, which provides academic services to under-represented students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

During his first semester at UM, Nunez joined the UM Rosenstiel School Laboratory of Marine Genomics, where he studies how genomes in the mummichog fish respond to changes in temperature. His work has implications for climate change and the global distribution of fish populations.

Associate Professor of Marine Biology Marjorie Oleksiak, who leads the marine genomics lab, wrote, “Mr. Nunez has proven to be responsible and dedicated, but also enthusiastic and curious.” She said that this “dedicated scholar” has an innate “ability to see a need or opportunity and act on it,” adding, “Often, what he does is above and beyond the call of duty.”

The Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Program was established by Congress in 1986 to honor Senator Barry M. Goldwater, who served his country for 56 years as a soldier and statesman, including 30 years of service in the U.S. Senate.  The purpose of the foundation is to provide a continuing source of highly qualified scientists, mathematicians, and engineers by awarding scholarships to college students who intend to pursue careers in these fields. For more information, visit: www.act.org/goldwater 

CARTHE Air & Ocean Photo Contest

Do you often see incredible natural phenomena appearing on the sea surface or sky? Snap a picture of it and you can win cool gear from CARTHE – The Consortium for Advanced Research on Transport of Hydrocarbons in the Environment.

To participate in the CARTHE Air & Ocean Photo Contest, simply observe nature, capture its beauty, and share it! For example, the various “textures” of the sea surface with different wind conditions, accumulation of sea weed and other debris along lines parallel to the wind, strong contrast in colors and sea texture at river inlets, and dynamic air-sea interactions. For more information, visit the CARTHE website.

IMG_8204Here are the rules:

Entry Rules

  • Images can be of the ocean, coastal water systems, inland water systems, or air/atmospheric systems.
  • The CARTHE Photography Contest is open to all amateur photographers. Amateur photographers are those who earn no more than 20% of their income from their photography. Eligible photos are those that have not been published or accepted for publication and must have been taken by the person submitting the entry. The Photographer must have ownership and copyright of all entries.
  • All photographs must be taken in a natural fresh-water or salt-water environment.
  • Digital editing of photographs is acceptable in moderation. Only minor adjustments will be accepted (ie. minor brightness, contrast, or cropping). Any heavily filtered or manipulated photograph will be rejected at judges’ discretion.
  • Ownership and copyright of all entries remain with the photographer. CARTHE, GoMRI, and RSMAS reserves the right to publish the winning photos without compensation for educational purposes, including, but not limited to publication on the CARTHE/GoMRI/University of Miami/RSMAS websites, social media, in brochures or for future contest promotion. Proper credit will be given to all winners.
  • By submitting your images, you are agreeing to the terms above.

Snap away and good luck!