Provosts’ and AGU Student Paper Award Winners

Several UM Rosenstiel School faculty received awards for their research from the UM Office of the Provost.

Bill Johns accepts research awardWilliam Johns, professor of ocean sciences, received a Provost’s Funding Award. This new UM research award recognizes productivity in research, as evidenced by sustained, peer-reviewed extramural funding and is selected by a committee of Research Deans. “Your ability to propose and perform innovative and relevant research, and thus maintain a well-funded research program over an extended period of time, is exemplary,” said UM Vice Provost for Research John Bixby.

Johns is a seagoing oceanographer specializing in the use of long-term moored instrumentation to study ocean circulation. His research involves studies of the large-scale wind-driven circulation, with emphasis on the dynamics of western boundary currents, and on deep flows related to the global thermohaline circulation and climate variability.

The 2017 Provost’s Research Award recipients from the Rosenstiel School are:

  • Douglas Crawford Department of Marine Biology & Ecology                            Project, titled “Providing Physiological Phenotypes for 1,000 Human Genomes to Interpret the Importance of DNA Sequence Variation.”
  • Cassandra Gaston Department of Atmospheric Sciences                               Project, titled “Determining the Impact of Saharan Dust on Clouds and Climate.”
  • Neil Hammerschlag Department of Marine Ecosystems & Society                   Project, titled “Assessing Performance Breadth of Large Mobile Fishes in Relation to Temperature Variability Using Multi-sensor Biotelemetry.”

The Provost’s Awards for Scholarly Activity and Research Awards were presented on March 29 at a special event to recognize their research accomplishments. The Provost’s Research Awards are administered by the UM Office of the Vice Provost for Research to provide salary support and direct research costs to faculty for research.

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AGU Outstanding Student Paper Award

AJDA SAVARIN

AJDA SAVARIN

UM Rosenstiel School graduate student Ajda Savarin won the AGU Outstanding Student Paper Award at the 2016 AGU Fall Meeting for her research presentation, titled “Diurnal Cycle of Convection and Air-Sea-Land Interaction Associated with MJO over the Maritime Continent.”

“There is a lot of competition for this distinguished award,” Michael G. Brown, professor of ocean sciences and director of the UM Rosenstiel School graduate program, “Congratulations to Ajda!”

Savarin is pursuing a Ph.D. in Meteorology and Physical Oceanography. Her research relates to the study of an atmospheric phenomenon called the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), including in its initiation, and its eastward propagation across the region of Maritime Continent, and modeling those processes using the Unified Wave Interface – Coupled Model (UWIN-CM).

RECOVER Launches New Website

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The Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative (GoMRI) consortium RECOVER recently launched their new website at www.miami.edu/recover. It will act as a centralized hub for information regarding the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science led consortium focusing on the effects of crude oil on fish. Visitors to the site can expect to learn about new findings, classroom and virtual learning activities, hatchery tour information, and videos relative to the ongoing work.

Watch an introduction video to the RECOVER project.

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RECOVER (Relationship of Effects of Cardiac Outcomes in fish for Validation of Ecological Risk) is a consortium comprised of seven researchers from four institutions. Led by Professor Martin Grosell, the team is studying the impacts and toxic effects of crude oil on ecologically and commercially important fish from the Gulf of Mexico. Two species that are currently being examined are the pelagic mahi-mahi and the coastal redfish. Studies will range from molecular, cellular, organ level and whole animal physiologic as well as behavior analyses at different life stages. Previous findings by team members have already shown that fish embryos and larvae exposed to crude oil during early development results in malformation of hearts, resulting in mortality or reduced cardiac and swimming performance in surviving individuals.

To learn more about RECOVER and their current findings please visit www.miami.edu/recover and follow them on social media.

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Dan DiNicola

RECOVER Outreach Coordinator