About UM Rosenstiel School

About the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School The University of Miami is one of the largest private research institutions in the southeastern United States. The University’s mission is to provide quality education, attract and retain outstanding students, support the faculty and their research, and build an endowment for University initiatives. Founded in the 1940’s, the Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science has grown into one of the world’s premier marine and atmospheric research institutions. Offering dynamic interdisciplinary academics, the Rosenstiel School is dedicated to helping communities to better understand the planet, participating in the establishment of environmental policies, and aiding in the improvement of society and quality of life. For more information, please visit www.rsmas.miami.edu.

Aquaculture, alumni, and more…

The Future of Aquaculture

Juvenile Mahi-Mahi

Juvenile Mahi-Mahi

UM Rosenstiel School Professor of Marine Ecosystems and Society Daniel Benetti published an essay on the future of aquaculture in the current issue of The Journal of Ocean Technology.

“In the field of aquaculture, technology has evolved at an enormous pace during the last two decades. Advances in technology are allowing all of us involved in the field, from scientists to operators, to address and tackle most, if not all, contentious issues in aquaculture.”

“Modern aquaculture relies on advanced technologies to produce wholesome seafood for human consumption. Indeed, aquaculture has become as important as farming and agriculture, currently contributing over 50% of wholesome seafood for human consumption worldwide. Aquaculture production continues to increase exponentially and is the fastest growing food production sector, having surpassed beef production in 2012-13 (66 million metric tons vs. 63 million metric tons). “

Read Dr. Benetti’s article in the JOT issue titled “Changing Tides in Ocean Technology,” (Volume 9 Number 2 (Jul. – Oct. 2014), An electronic subscription is required for full access to the issue.

Award-winning Student

MPO student Jie He

Jie He

UM Rosenstiel School Ph.D student Jie He was recently awarded “Outstanding Presentation for Students and Early Career Scientists” at the 7th International Scientific Conference on the Global Water and Energy Cycle, which took place in the Hague, Netherlands in July 2014. He is a Meteorology and Physical Oceanography  student studying the role of sea surface temperature pattern change in a warming climate in  Professor Brian Soden’s lab.

 

Alumnus Appoint President of Penn State University

Eric  J. Barron

Eric J. Barron

UM Rosenstiel School alumnus Eric Barron recently took the helm as president of Penn State University. Barron received his Master of Science (’76) and Ph.D (’80) in oceanography from the UM Rosenstiel School. In addition, he spent one year as an associate professor at UM before taking up a new post at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado.

Barron has a distinguished resume, as the former President of Florida State University he lead the university’s rise to a U.S. News & World Report ranking as the most efficiently operated university in the nation. His expertise in the areas of climate, environmental change and oceanography, among other earth science topics, have led to extensive service for the federal government and the international community. Read more on about Penn State’s new president here.

 

 

Scientific Drones Help Understand Formation of Bahamas Islands

University of Miami graduate student Kelly Jackson and Camera Wings Aerial Photography recently teamed up to capture high-resolution photographs of remote islands in the Bahamas using specially equipped drones. The study is aimed at finding new ways to more precisely study the geological evidence preserved inside bedrock during critical events in Earth’s history.

The UM Rosenstiel School and Camera Wings Aerial Photography teams prepare to launch a drone

The UM Rosenstiel School and Camera Wings Aerial Photography teams prepare to launch a drone. From left to right: Robert Youens (CW), Brent Hall (CW) Gregor Eberli (UM), Kelly Jackson (UM), and Mitch Harris (UM).

“Drones are changing the way geologists map,” said Jackson, a Ph.D. student in the Marine Geology and Geophysics program at the UM Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science. “It is now possible to acquire high-resolution photographs and elevation data of the hardest to reach locations.”

From the deck of the John G. Shedd Aquarium’s research vessel R/V Coral Reef II, Jackson and her team launched this unmanned aircraft outfitted with high-resolution digital cameras and position loggers over the remote islands of the Exuma Cays. Their goal of the study is to look back in time at the formation of the islands, which was driven by rapid fluctuations in sea level 125,000 years ago during the Pleistocene.

A drones-eye view of the Bahamas.

A drones-eye view of the Bahamas.

Using this newly available data from the drone technology, scientists can develop more detailed 3-D maps of the complex carbonate deposits, which holds important information about what Earth was like during the last interglacial period, when warmer global temperatures caused glacial melting.

Jackson and her team are currently analyzing the data obtained from the drone mapping survey.

A drone captures a photo of the research team below.

A drone captures a photo of the research team below.

– Annie Reisewitz 

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Hurricane Warning: Consume Rainbow Spaghetti with Caution

Most of the United States is well-aware of the dangers of “drinking the Kool-Aid” when it is time to form an opinion on a particular subject. However, the dangers of “eating the rainbow spaghetti” have not yet permeated the consciousness of the general public when interpreting the forecasts of hurricanes and tropical storms (tropical cyclones, or TCs). The spaghetti plot or spaghetti diagram is a visualization tool that shows the predicted paths (tracks) or wind speeds (intensities) of the numerous different TC models. Each potential TC track and intensity is shaded a different color; hence the appearance that the graphic is filled with rainbow spaghetti.

Examples of spaghetti diagrams for track and intensity from Tropical Storm Arthur 2014. (NCAR)

Examples of spaghetti diagrams for track and intensity from Tropical Storm Arthur 2014. (NCAR)

If used correctly, the spaghetti diagram can be a valuable forecasting tool. Viewing all of the potential tracks and intensities of the most realistic TC models helps scientists to understand how each model’s formulation (parameterizations, data assimilation schemes, etc.) can lead to different predicted outcomes. Additionally, the agreement or lack of agreement (commonly referred to as spread) between the models is often related to the confidence one should place in a particular forecast. If the models’ tracks and intensities are grouped together, it is often an indication that the hurricane’s future is more predictable. As a result, the spaghetti diagram can be used as a supplement to the National Hurricane Center’s (NHC) official track and intensity forecast.

When a tropical depression, tropical storm, or hurricane is present in the Atlantic or Eastern Pacific Ocean, the NHC issues an official intensity and track forecast. The intensity forecast is reported as a predicted wind speed but there are no details regarding the uncertainty in the forecast. Instead, ambitious users could look over the error statistics from past years to provide an expectation for the errors of the current storm. However, historical trends are not always the best guide for the intensity errors in individual storms, and errors often vary significantly depending on the situation. The ability to look at a spaghetti diagram and diagnose the spread of the models’ forecasts is helpful for anticipating the reliability of a particular hurricane’s intensity forecast.

(Top Panel) Spaghetti diagram for Tropical Storm Debby at 0600 UTC (2 am EST) on June 24, 2012.  (Bottom Panel) NHC official forecast track cone for Tropical Storm Debby at the same time as the spaghetti diagram. Figures courtesy of NCAR and NOAA.

(Top Panel) Spaghetti diagram for Tropical Storm Debby at 0600 UTC (2 am EST) on June 24, 2012. (Bottom Panel) NHC official forecast track cone for Tropical Storm Debby at the same time as the spaghetti diagram. Figures courtesy of NCAR and NOAA.

Spaghetti diagrams provide a similar advantage for track forecasts. Unlike intensity forecasts, NHC’s track forecasts provide some basic uncertainty information by surrounding the predicted storm path with a forecast cone. Before each hurricane season begins, the size of the forecast cone for the year is calculated based on the NHC official forecast track errors for all storms over the past five years. The same cone is used for the whole hurricane season, no matter how confident the NHC is (see “Forecast Cone Refresher”). By evaluating the spaghetti diagram alongside the forecast cone, it is possible to foresee the situations where the cone is more reliable than others.

The 2012 track forecasts of Tropical Storm Debby are a perfect example of how useful the spaghetti diagram can be. While the NHC forecast cone was showing a developing tropical storm moving westward off the Louisiana coast, half of the model tracks were directed eastward into the panhandle of Florida. Debby eventually migrated eastward and made landfall as a weak tropical storm north of Tampa Bay, Florida. The spaghetti diagram helped reveal the particular forecast cone was less reliable than normal and that there was a possibility the storm could travel in a completely different direction than the forecast cone.

Still, the spaghetti diagram quickly loses value if evaluated by an uninformed eye. With all the cryptic model abbreviations that accompany the diagram, it is hard for the average person to develop any intuition on what models normally perform better than others. Along with the NHC official forecast (shown as OFCI on the spaghetti diagrams), there are four main types of models that are typically included in spaghetti diagrams: trajectory/statistical, statistical-dynamical, dynamical, and consensus. All of these models arrive at their predictions using different methodologies.  The consensus aids are not independent; they are simply averages of other models.  Some of the models you see on spaghetti plots are outlined in the table below, and a more complete list is available here.

A selection of some of the model guidance routinely available to hurricane forecasters. Highlighted sections include very simple trajectory or statistical models (blue), skillful but still relatively simple statistical-dynamical schemes (green),  dynamical models (red), and averages of certain model combinations (tan).

A selection of some of the model guidance routinely available to hurricane forecasters. Highlighted sections include very simple trajectory or statistical models (blue), skillful but still relatively simple statistical-dynamical schemes (green), dynamical models (red), and averages of certain model combinations (tan).

Most spaghetti diagrams for track forecasts will include the models: “BAMS”, “BAMM”, and “BAMD”. These track models are called trajectory models and are much simpler than full dynamical or statistical-dynamical models. Trajectory models use data from dynamical models to estimate the winds at different layers of the atmosphere that are steering the TC but they do not account for the TC interacting with the surrounding atmosphere. Due to this major simplification, trajectory models should rarely be taken seriously but are included on the plots for reference. Averaged over the past five years, these models have track errors that are almost double the best performing model for a particular forecast time.

Statistical models produce track and intensity forecasts that are based solely on climatology and persistence. In other words, these models create a forecast for a TC using information on how past TCs behaved during similar times of the year at comparable locations and intensities (climatology) while also taking into account the recent movement and intensity change of the TC (persistence). Statistical models do not use any information about the atmospheric environment of the TC. As a result, statistical models are outperformed considerably by dynamical, statistical-dynamical, and consensus forecasts and should only be used as benchmarks of skill against the more complex and accurate models. The main track and intensity statistical models included on spaghetti diagrams are respectively CLP5 and SHF5. An even simpler statistical track “model” that is included on some spaghetti diagrams is XTRP (an extrapolation of the future direction of a hurricane solely based on its motion over the past 12 hours).

Statistical-dynamical models are similar to statistical models except that they also use output from the dynamical models on the environmental conditions surrounding the TC and storm-specific details to predict intensity change. The statistical-dynamical models commonly shown on intensity spaghetti diagrams are SHIP, DSHP, and LGEM. SHIP and DSHP are identical except DSHP accounts for the intensity decay of TCs over land and is therefore more accurate than SHIPS. LGEM is the best performing out of the three models. Both LGEM and DSHP are similar in skill to the dynamical models. These models are not capable of predicting rapid changes in intensity, nor are they meant to forecast intensity of weak disturbances.

Dynamical models make track and intensity forecasts by solving the equations that describe the evolution of the atmosphere. There are two main reasons why different dynamical models produce track and intensity forecasts that always differ even though they share a common goal of reproducing the physical processes of the atmosphere. First, even with the growing network of scientific instruments scattered across the globe and space, models have an imperfect picture of the current conditions in the atmosphere. This uncertainty in the current state of the atmosphere cannot be remedied; we do not have the resources to blanket every piece of the Earth and sky with instruments and measure all the necessary atmospheric parameters simultaneously. Additionally, all instruments have inherent measurement errors. Each model uniquely uses the imperfect and sometimes sparse observations available to arrive at slightly different starting points for their forecast. Secondly, even using the most cutting-edge computer systems in the world, the equations that govern the atmosphere cannot be solved for every inch of the atmosphere; it would take too long. Models have to solve equations on a 3-dimensional grid that spans the surface of the Earth and extends upward around 10 miles. Thus, even the finest resolution operational hurricane models have grid points horizontally separated by nearly 2 miles.

Scientists know that this level of detail is not sufficient; there are important physical processes happening within the grid boxes that affect the TC’s evolution. To prevent the weather that is happening at your friend’s house two miles away from being used to describe the weather at your house, modelers often use different “parameterizations”. This fancy word boils down to a variety of approximations used to extrapolate weather at larger scales (at the grid points) to smaller scales (within the grid points). The different dynamical models use a variety of grid sizes and parameterizations to capture some of TC’s small-scale processes, but these approximations ultimately lead to the models developing the TC in different ways.

The simplest dynamical model shown on spaghetti diagrams is the LBAR model, which is only a track model. Analogously to the trajectory models, the approximations used for LBAR lead to large errors and over the long-term, it is one of the worst performing models. The rest of the dynamical models depicted on spaghetti diagrams perform at a higher  level. Most spaghetti diagrams include the “early models” or “early-version” of these dynamical models because they are available to NHC during the forecast cycle. These track and intensity dynamical models often include the GFDI, HWFI, and AVNI/GFSI. These models are called interpolated models (that’s the “I” on the end) because they are adjusted versions of “late models”; the previous run’s forecast is interpolated to the current time because the current run is not available yet.

The fourth class of guidance included on spaghetti diagrams is the consensus model, which is actually not a model at all. Consensus forecasts are a combination of forecasts from a collection of models, usually obtained by averaging them together. For the spaghetti diagrams of intensity forecasts, the consensus models typically included are ICON and IVCN. The consensus models for track forecasts that are normally shown are TCON, TVCE (also known as TVCN), and AEMI.

The dynamical, statistical-dynamical, consensus models, and NHC official forecast all perform at a similar level for track and intensity forecasts, while the trajectory and statistical models have significantly higher errors. Yet when someone sees one of these inferior models deviating from the rest and steering a strong hurricane into their backyard, the natural intuition is to panic. In these situations, it is important to remember which are the more skillful models.

Still, among the skillful models, some perform a little better on average than the others but there is currently no way to foresee the dominant model(s) for a particular scenario. In fact, models will seemingly have good days and bad days, good months and bad months, and even good years and bad years. That is why an informed rainbow spaghetti consumer should not focus too much on an individual noodle but instead use all of the noodles as a side dish to NHC’s forecast cone. So when staring down an approaching hurricane this season, feel free to grab a colorful bowl of spaghetti, just remember to consume with care.

- Kieran Bhatia (PhD candidate in the Department of Atmospheric Sciences)

Researchers Take to the Skies to Study Earth’s Climate

UM Rosenstiel School co-principal investigator Elliot Atlas (standing) during 2012 ATTREX mission.

UM Rosenstiel School co-principal investigator Elliot Atlas (standing) during 2012 ATTREX mission.

UM Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science professor Elliot Atlas recently returned from the two-month long CONTRAST (Convective Transport of Active Species in the Tropics) field experiment in the western Pacific Ocean. The research study focused on understanding the climate impact of trace gases transported from the ocean surface, up through a chimney of clouds and into the upper atmosphere.

Atlas, a professor of atmospheric chemistry, was a co-principal investigator of the first-of-its-kind National Science Foundation-funded research project into the chemistry of the tropical atmosphere.

Atlas is interested in trace gases that are linked to the formation and destruction of ozone in different layers of Earth’s atmosphere.  In the upper part of the atmosphere, known as the stratosphere, ozone absorbs much of the harmful UV radiation coming from the sun.  In the lower atmosphere, the presence of ozone is critical to facilitate the natural processes that cleanse the air of harmful pollutants.  In the region where the lower and upper atmosphere meet, ozone acts as a greenhouse gas and its abundance can be linked to global climate change.

The thickness of the ozone layer varies worldwide, being smaller at the equator and bigger near the poles. The ozone layer has been depleted in recent years due to large quantities of man-made compounds, including the most well known, the aerosol sprays containing CFCs.

Ozone Depleted

Members of the CONTRAST, CAST, and ATTREX research teams. Credit: NCAR

Members of the CONTRAST, CAST, and ATTREX research teams. Credit: NCAR

One question Atlas and his co-investigators Ross Salawitch from the University of Maryland and Laura Pan from the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), are trying to answer is, “what controls the abundance and variation of ozone in the atmosphere?”

To get closer to the answer, the CONTRAST team took to the sky to study the chemistry of clouds half a world away – in Guam. Understanding how atmospheric gases contribute to ozone abundances, and therefore Earth’s overall radiation budget from the sun, is critical for scientists to improve global climate change models.

“When you press on one side of the climate system, you get a response somewhere else,” says Atlas, explaining how seemingly different environments are linked in the global climate system.

View of convective clouds at 14 Km from one of the CONTRAST research flights. Credit: Laura Pan

View of convective clouds at 14 Km from one of the CONTRAST research flights. Credit: Laura Pan

A unique cluster of convective clouds – a virtual global chimney – forms over the western Pacific Ocean and is particularly intense during the winter in the Northern Hemisphere.  The tropical chimney is key to determining the chemical composition of the air entering the stratosphere. Huge clusters of thunderstorms feed heat and moisture as well as gases and particles into the upper atmosphere and eventually into the stratosphere, where they can influence climate on a global scale.

Of particular interest to Atlas and his UM-based research team is the role of chemicals containing bromine. Bromine-containing chemicals are emitted into the atmosphere from two distinct sources – a man-made source, which include compounds commonly used in fire extinguishers and can remain in the atmosphere for decades, and a natural source of short-lived compounds produced by tiny marine organisms in the ocean.

The bromine component of these chemicals can rapidly react with ozone as the compounds decompose in the atmosphere. Man-made bromides leave long-lived fingerprints that can be easily identified. What UM Rosenstiel School scientists are investigating are the poorly understood natural bromine concentrations from the ocean that is lofted into the atmosphere through the tropical chimney.

UM Rosenstiel School post-doctoral researcher Maria Navarro monitoring in-flight data collection.

UM Rosenstiel School post-doctoral researcher Maria Navarro monitoring in-flight data collection.

Atlas, and his UM research team, which included post-doctoral researcher Maria Navarro and research fellow Valeria Donets, took to the sky to study the trace gases in the atmosphere that are produced in high amounts by marine organisms in the warm tropical waters of the western Pacific.

“We want to know what happens to the bromine contained in gases from marine organisms when they are moved by clouds from the near the ocean surface up to the boundary of the stratosphere, over 9 miles up,” says Atlas.

Taking Flight

Stainless steel air sample canisters installed inside the NSF G-V aircraft to analyze trace gases.

Stainless steel air sample canisters installed inside the NSF G-V aircraft to analyze trace gases.

To collect bromine-containing gases, Atlas and colleagues built a specially designed instrument to fly onboard the NSF’s Gulfstream G-V aircraft during the 16 eight-hour CONTRAST flights. The aircraft flew at an altitude ranging from 0.5-15 km (0.2-9 miles), well above the limits of commercial airplanes, during January and February of 2014. The high altitude capabilities of this aircraft allowed the large team of scientists and engineers from multiple universities and research organizations participating in the project to study a critical part of the upper atmosphere that was unreachable by previous research aircraft.

To study the various chemical and physical components of the chimney cloud and the surrounding air, the aircraft was outfitted inside and out with state-of-the-art equipment that measure the many gases and air particles in the skies as the aircraft flew through the atmosphere, along with other data to understand the state of the atmosphere during the flights. During each mission, researchers at the shore-based operation center on Guam watched as data streamed back in real time and they communicated with colleagues onboard the aircraft to make spur-of-the-moment decisions about where additional sampling should take place. While instruments on the aircraft were making real-time measurements, trace gases were also being collected in airtight canisters for further in-depth analysis back in Atlas’ lab.

Now that the scientists have returned to their home bases, the data collected during the mission will be further analyzed and used to test how well current climate models depict cloud convection processes and the chemical composition of the tropical atmosphere, with a goal of improving how climate models predict future climate changes.

CONTRAST was conducted in collaboration with two other field experiments to take a comprehensive look at the entire region – the UK-led CAST (Coordinated Airborne Studies in the Tropics) experiment flew an instrument-laden aircraft to perform detailed studies in the atmosphere from near the ocean surface up to 6 km (3.7 mi), while the high-altitude ATTREX (Airborne Tropical Tropopause Experiment) mission using NASA’s Global Hawk unmanned drone studied the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere from 14-19 km (9-12 mi) altitude. The NSF G-V aircraft overlapped the study regions of the other two aircraft and sampled near the altitude of the outflow of the tropical cloud chimney.

“These combined aircraft measurements will provide an unprecedented description of the tropical atmosphere, from the ocean surface to the lower stratosphere, which will ultimately improve our current understanding of the atmosphere and our ability to make predictions about the role of atmospheric chemistry and tropical convection in a future climate,” said Atlas.

–Annie Reisewitz

 

 

 

Honors and Awards

Editor-in-Chief Nick Shay

Rosenstiel School Professor Dr. Nick Shay

Rosenstiel School Professor Dr. Nick Shay

Rosenstiel School Professor Lynn “Nick” Shay will take on the role of Editor-in-Chief of the Elsevier journal Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans this July.

Shay, a professor in the Department of Ocean Sciences at the UM Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, has been an active member of the Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans Editorial Board for a number of years.

His research interests include experimental and theoretical investigations of the ocean response and coupled air-sea

interactions during hurricanes, airborne oceanographic profiling of upper ocean variability, coastal oceanographic process studies, and high frequency (HF) and satellite radar remote sensing to examine the linkages between surface signatures and upper ocean structure. He has authored over ninety peer-reviewed manuscripts and book chapters and has chaired or served on thirty student committees.

He serves on various panels and committees: Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association Board of Directors; National Federation of Regional Association National HF Radar Steering Team; NSF and NOAA Hurricanes at Landfall Co-chair; NOAA Hurricane Forecast Improvement Project Observing and Coupled Modeling Teams; Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System-Regional Association Observations Committee; and the NASA Hurricane Science Team. Internationally, he has been the Oceanic Impacts and Air-Sea Interaction rapporteur for the World Meteorological Organization’s (WMO) International Workshop for Tropical Cyclones; panel member of the WMO Landfall Processes; and HFR Oceanography Workshops.

He is also a Fellow of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) and was part of a NASA Group Achievement Award for his work with satellite altimetry during the Genesis and Rapid Intensity (GRIP) Program conducted in the fall of 2010.

Teaching Assistant Excellence Award Winners

RSMAS campusCongratulations to the 2013-14 Rosenstiel School Teaching Assistant (TA) Excellence Award Winners!

Undergraduate Lecture: Stacy Aguilera

Undergraduate Lab: I-Kuan Hu

Graduate Course: Bruce Pholot

“There were many nominees for these awards this year, and the competition was tough,” said Amy Clement, Rosenstiel School professor and associate dean for graduate studies. “Thanks to all the TAs and faculty for the hard work. We look forward to continuing to make it a very valuable experience for all involved in the coming years!”

Alumni News

Rosenstiel School alumna Dr. Linda Duguay

Rosenstiel School alumna Dr. Linda Duguay

Rosenstiel School alumna Linda Duguay has been elected president of the Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO), the largest international organization devoted to the aquatic sciences. She has been elected for the 2016-2018 term.

Duguay received her M.S. degree in 1973 from the Rosenstiel School where she focused her studies on the ecology of the ctenophore Mnemiopsis mccradyi in Biscayne Bay followed by a Ph.D. in Biological Oceanography for her research on calcium metabolism and photosynthetic carbon fixation in benthic Foraminifera symbiotic with microalgae.

Duguay is director of the University of Southern California (USC) Sea Grant Program and director of research for the Wrigley Institute for Environmental Studies at USC.

 

Student and Alumni: Award Winners

UM Rosenstiel School Awards

Honghai Zhang, recipient of the Frank J. Millero Prize with UM Rosenstiel School Professor Amy Clement.

Honghai Zhang, recipient of the Frank J. Millero Prize with UM Rosenstiel School Professor Amy Clement.

Honghai Zhang is the recipient of the Frank J. Millero Prize. In honor of long-serving Rosenstiel School Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Frank Millero, the Millero Prize is awarded annually to a Rosenstiel School Ph.D. student whose single or first-authored peer-reviewed publication is original and significant enough to merit special recognition (best student publication). Zhang was awarded the prize for the 2013 paper, titled ‘South Pacific Meridional Mode: A Mechanism for ENSO-like Variability,’ published in the Journal of Climate.

Robert Letscher, Postdoctorate researcher at the University of California, Irvine is the recipient of the F.G. Walton Smith Prize for his research of “Controls on dissolved organic matter distribution and fate in the ocean.”

MPO graduate Falko Judt and MBF graduate student Andrew Kempsell are the most recent recipients of the Koczy Prize. In honor of the late Dr. Fritz Koczy, this prize is intended to provide support for a doctoral candidate in his/her final year.

Judt joined the UM Rosenstiel School as an undergrad in meteorology in 2006 and as a MPO grad student in 2008. He is currently a PhD student in MPO under Shuyi Chen and serves as president of the local Chapter of the American Meteorological Society.  Kempsell received his B.S. in biology in 2009 from the University of California, Los Angeles and is currently a Ph.D. candidate studying aging-related changes in the nervous system of Aplysia californica under Lynne Fieber.

MPO graduate student Elizabeth Wong received the Dean’s Prize in recognition of her achievement at the master’s level for the outstanding thesis in marine and atmospheric science. Wong is currently a Ph.D. student in MPO with Peter Minnett studying “Retrieval of the Skin Sea Surface Temperature Using Hyperspectral Measurements From the Marine-Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer.”

Alumni Awards

UM Rosenstiel School Alumnus Doug Capone

UM Rosenstiel School Alumnus Doug Capone

UM Rosenstiel School Alumnus Douglas G. Capone is the winner of the 2014 DuPont Industrial Biosciences Award in Applied and Environmental Microbiology from the American Society for Microbiology for his outstanding accomplishments as a marine microbiologist. Capone received his Ph.D. from the UM Rosenstiel School in 1978 and is currently a faculty member at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles.

“His contributions to our understanding of the factors controlling biological nitrogen fixation in the oceans have strongly influenced numerous researchers and the development of important ideas in biogeochemistry and biological oceanography,” says Bess Ward, Princeton University.

His research focuses on the importance of marine microbes in major biogeochemical cycles, particularly those of nitrogen and carbon, with particular reference to physical, chemical, and biotic controls on key microbial processes. He is a leading expert on the marine N cycle and has produced two highly regarded edited volumes on the topic. Capone has studied diverse ecosystems at remote field stations and on over 30 oceanographic expeditions. He has also made a major contribution to the development of human resources in oceanography and environmental science by mentoring students of all levels.