Undergraduate Programs

Marine and Atmospheric Science Course Descriptions

Atmospheric Science

 

ATM102: Introduction to Weather and Climate (3 cr, Fall) Structure, physics, dynamics and thermodynamics of the atmosphere; weather phenomena weather forecasting, climate and climate change. Contemporary topics covered in this class include global warming, the ozone hole, hurricanes and El Nino. Not for major or minor.

ATM103: Survey of Modern Meteorology (3 cr, Fall)   Dynamics and thermodynamics of the atmosphere as they relate to contemporary issues in meteorology. Overview of numerical weather prediction techniques and new technologies for monitoring weather and climate. Prerequisite: MTH 108.

ATM111: Introduction to Marine Science (3 cr,Fall) Geological, physical, chemical and biological processes of the world's oceans; the role of the oceans in global dynamics and ocean management.  Field trips included.

ATM112: Introduction to Marine Science (3 cr, Fall) Laboratory and field exercises to accompany Marine Science (MSC111). Co-requisites or Prerequisite: MSC111

ATM118: Current Weather and Climate Topics (2 cr, Spring) Weather-and Climate- related phenomena such as hurricanes, severe storms, global warning, and acid rain.

ATM220: Global Climate Change (3cr, Fall and Spring) The Earth’s climate and the role of natural and anthropogenic processes in shaping climate change.

ATM243: Weather Forecasting (3 cr, Fall) Application of physical principles to weather forecasting; use and interpretation of computer-generated forecast guidance products of the U.S. Weather Service. Prerequisites:  ATM 103 and MTH 108

ATM265: Atmospheric Chemistry (3 cr, Spring)  ATM 265 is focused on those aspects of environmental chemistry of most relevance to meteorology students. The class fulfills the American Meteorological Society (AMS) chemistry expectations, and ATM program requirements, for a Bachelors Degree in Meteorology. Students interested in pursuing upper-level chemistry courses, including MSC 215 (Chemical Oceanography), and pre-med majors, are recommended to take CHM 111 to meet requirements for the Meteorology B.S. Degree.

ATM303: Atmospheric Observation (3 cr, Spring) Techniques for measuring meteorological variables at the ground and in the free atmosphere. Prerequisites:  ATM 103 and PHY 101 or PHY 205

ATM305: Atmospheric Thermodynamics (3 cr, Fall) Equation of state; water vapor and moist air thermodynamics; phase changes and latent heat; buoyancy and atmospheric convection; thermodynamic diagrams. Prerequisites:  PHY 205

ATM306:  Advanced Principles in Broadcast Meteorology (3 cr, Spring) Broadcast meteorology including the production of professional weather briefings and weather news for on camera delivery. Emphasis on accurately communicating complex meteorological concepts, use of computer graphics, and on-camera delivery.  Prerequisite: ATM 103 or permission of instructor

ATM307: Introduction to the Physics of Climate (3 cr, Spring) The physical mechanisms which govern the earth’s climate and climate variability. Prerequisite: ATM 305

ATM321:  Scientific Programming in the Atmospheric Sciences (3 cr, alternate Springs) An introduction to scientific programming in a Linux environment using the FORTRAN 90/95 language with specific applications to meteorology. Prerequisites: (CSC 120)

ATM371:  Readings In Atmospheric Science (1- 2 cr, Fall and Spring) Library research with faculty supervision. Bibliography to be submitted in preparation for laboratory and/or field research project. Maximum 3 credits count towards major or minor.

ATM405: Atmospheric Dynamics I  (3 cr, Spring) Derivation and scaling of the equations of atmospheric motion; hydrostatic and geostrophic balance; circulation and vorticity. Pre-requisites: MSC 305 OR ATM 305, AND MTH 310; or permission of instructor

ATM406:  Atmospheric Dynamics II (3 cr, Fall) Baroclinic and barotropic instability; boundary layer dynamics; mathematical principles of numerical weather prediction; maintenance of the general circulation. Prerequisite: ATM 405.

ATM407:  Weather Analysis (3 cr, Fall) Three-dimensional analysis of synoptic-scale weather systems; application of the fundamental laws of atmospheric dynamics to observed weather patterns; practical questions of worldwide data exchange and display. Prerequisite: ATM 305.

ATM409:  Physical Meteorology (3 cr, Spring) Atmospheric radiation; absorption and scattering principles of remote sensing of the atmosphere; cloud microphysics; nucleation, coalescence, ice crystal growth, atmospheric electricity and lighting. Prerequisite: ATM 305.

ATM411: Projects in Atmospheric Science (1- 3 cr, Fall and Spring) Individual, independent research projects with faculty supervision. A formal written report is required. No more than 6 credits in total from MSC371, MSC411, and MSC412 can be counted towards the MSC major or minor requirements Prerequisite: ATM 371

ATM412: Undergraduate Thesis in Atmospheric Science (1cr, Fall, Spring, Summer) Undergraduate thesis in Atmospheric Science. Students will write a formal thesis summarizing the results of independent research carried out under faculty supervision.  Prerequisite or co-requisite: ATM 411 and permission of instructor

 

Marine Science

 

MSC101: Survey of Oceanography (3 cr, Fall, Spring and Summer) Introduction to the oceans and their significance to mankind, encompassing geological, physical, chemical, and biological processes; man’s role in and on the sea, including fisheries, pollution, and ocean management. Not for major or minor.

MSC103: Survey of Modern Meteorology (3 cr, Fall) Dynamics and thermodynamics of the atmosphere as they relate to contemporary issues in meteorology.  Overview of numerical weather prediction techniques and new technologies for monitoring weather and climate.  Open to majors or minors with permission of instructor. Pre-requisite:  MTH108 or higher
 
MSC104: Molecules of Life (3 cr, Spring) Topics include: basic composition and chemistry of the atmosphere; chemical processes involved in regional air pollution and acid rain; health effects of air pollution; global change in the composition and climate of the atmosphere; stratospheric ozone, and global warming. The treatment will only utilize basic pre- calculus mathematics and high-school level chemistry. Not for major or minor

MSC107: Life in the Sea (3 cr, Spring) Lectures provide an introduction to the plants and animals of the sea, including plankton, nekton and the benthos, with anthropogenic impacts. Not for major or minors.

MSC108: Environmental Oceanography (3cr, Fall) This course will focus on environmental issues facing the oceans today, including global climate destabilization, the impact of population growth on coastal environments, marine pollution, and the state of marine fisheries. An active learning approach will be adopted, with emphasis on case studies and critical analysis. Marine environmental issues will be presented in self-contained analytical exercises. Information and questions on sustainability will be integrated throughout the course and students will be asked to think critically about these pressing concerns. Not for major or minor.

MSC111: Introduction to Marine Science (3 cr, Fall) Geological, physical, chemical and biological processes of the world’s oceans. The role of the oceans in global dynamics and ocean management.  Enrollment limited to Marine Science/Marine Affairs/Meteorology majors and minors. 

MSC112: Introduction to Marine Science Lab (1 cr, Fall and Spring) Laboratory and field exercises to accompany. Co-requisite or Pre-requisite:  MSC111

MSC115: Marine Environments of South Florida (2 cr, Summer Scholars Only) A field and lecture study of selected marine environments around South Florida, with emphasis on the interaction between organisms and the geological substrate.

MSC118: Current Weather and Climate Topics (1 cr, Spring) Weather and climate-related phenomena such as hurricanes, severe storms, and global warming. Not open to students with ATM118 credit.

MSC121:  Ocean Currents   (3cr, Spring) Ocean Currents will be a comprehensive, multi-disciplinary course on the history, geography, socio-economics, and physics of ocean currents.  The importance of ocean currents to socioeconomics, weather, climate, transport of fish larvae and pollutants, distribution of plankton and fish, military operations, and shipping will be illustrated using many examples. The history of ocean current observations, detailed maps of ocean circulation and its variability, and the evolution of instruments, and theories from ancient to modern times will be detailed.   The discovery and the most important observations of the major ocean currents will be discussed.  There will be also lectures on modern ocean circulation theory.  NON-MSC MAJORS ONLY

MSC172: Special Topics in Marine Science (2-6 cr, by announcement only) Content varies by semester and is indicated in parentheses following course number and title in class schedule.

MSC180: Seminar in Marine Science (1 cr, Spring) Seminar in current research as conducted by Marine Science faculty and graduate students.  This course is intended as an introduction for first year students to contemporary research topics. Pre-requisite: MSC111

MSC190: Studies in Marine Science (1-5 cr, transfer courses only) Course designation used for courses taken outside of UM with no UM equivalent. Not offered.
 
MSC191: Studies in Marine Policy (1-5 cr, transfer courses only) Course designation used for courses taken outside of UM with no UM equivalent. Not offered.

MSC204: Environmental Statistics (3 credits, Fall and Spring) This introductory course provides an overview of parametric and nonparametric statistics with an emphasis on applications in the analysis of environmental data. Does not count towards major or minor, but fulfills MSC statistics requirement. (Not open to students with credit in BIL 311 equivalent). Co-requisite: MSC111

MSC205: Mathematical Methods for Marine Science (3 cr, Spring) Is an applied mathematics course to provide students with the mathematical tools required to pursue advanced topics in Marine Science. Prerequisite: MTH162

MSC215: Chemical Oceanography (3 cr, Fall and Spring) An introduction to the chemistry of the oceans. Descriptive chemical oceanography of the components of ocean waters (metals, gases, organic compounds and nutrients). Biogeochemical cycles in oceanic systems. Prerequisites: CHM112.

MSC216: Chemical Oceanography Laboratory (1 cr, Fall and Spring) Chemical and physical methods in chemical oceanography. Analytical and instrumental techniques used to determine density, salinity, chlorinity, dissolved oxygen, nutrients and components of the carbonate system. Co-requisite: MSC 215.

MSC217: Physical and Chemical Processes in Coastal Ecosystems (3 cr, Spring) This course is primarily intended for students enrolled in the Marine Affairs program to serve as an introduction to the role of physical and chemical processes in estuarine and coastal ecosystems in the context of the management of estuarine and coastal waters.  Pre-requisites: MSC111, MSC230, or Departmental Consent.

MSC218:  Biological Oceanography (3cr, Spring) This course will examine energy flow in marine ecosystems, the biogeochemical cycles that control them, the wide variety of types of communities and ecosystems in different parts of the ocean, and the changes they have undergone over geological timescales.  Pre-requisites: MSC 111

MSC220: Global Climate Change (3cr, Fall and Spring) The Earth’s climate and the role of natural and anthropogenic processes in shaping climate change. Same as ATM220.

MSC222: The Earth’s Climate (3cr, Spring) This course will provide students with the foundation to better understand climate change on geological to human timescales.

MSC230:  Introduction to Marine Biology (3cr, Fall) The sea as an environment. Marine life, its special problems and adaptations; emphasis on Caribbean organisms.  One semester of biology and chemistry with laboratories.  Co-requisite:  MSC 232

MSC232:  Introduction to Marine Biology   (1cr, Fall) Laboratory exploring ecology, physiology and behavior of marine organisms in South Florida marine habitats; exercises cover laboratory techniques in behavior, functional morphology, productivity, fisheries research, osmoregulation and community ecology. Corequisite: MSC 230

MSC240: Introduction to Marine Geology (3 cr, Spring) The principal marine geological environments of the world, their substrate, their sediments, their flora and fauna, and their evolution through time. Prerequisites: GSC110 or GSC111

MSC264: Tropical Coastal Ecosystems (3 cr, Spring) Basic concepts of the ecology, management, conservation, and restoration of tropical marine ecosystems. The ecosystems and habitats to be discussed include coral reefs, seagrass beds, and mangrove forests. Special attention will be given to the management tools presently used to protect and recover these resources. Prerequisite: MSC111

MSC265: Tropical Coastal Ecosystems (1 cr, Spring) This course will complement the lecture based MSC264 (Science, Conservation, and Restoration of Tropical Coastal Ecosystems) by providing students with hands-on experience on common field survey methodologies used to assess the health of coastal ecosystems like seagrass beds and coral reefs and the opportunity to conduct a lab experiment on the effects of stressors like salinity, sedimentation, or nutrients on the growth and survivorship of the target organisms. Prerequisite: MSC264 or permission of instructor

MSC300: Water Resources: History, Management, and Policy (3 cr, by announcement only) An overview of the issues and problems surrounding the management of aquatic resources in the broadest sense including water quality of natural waters, drinking water, water pollution, water quantity and supply issues, watershed management, wetland protection and coastal management. We will explore the available strategies to wisely manage the various aquatic resources, policy options and their socio-economic aspects, legal frameworks, and institutional arrangements. The examples and cases discussed in the course will largely come from China, Vietnam, and the US.
 
MSC301: Introduction to Physical Oceanography (3 cr, Fall and Spring) Application of the laws of physics to the study of the properties and circulation of the world's oceans and atmosphere. Prerequisite: MSC111 and MTH162

MSC302: Introduction to Physical Oceanography lab (1 cr, Fall and Spring) Laboratory exercises and field work on basic fluid mechanics applicable to the ocean. Prerequisite or Corequisite: MSC301 or ATM405

MSC310: Living Resources of the Ocean (3 cr, Spring) Biology of marine fish and shellfish of major economic interest, techniques of harvesting, and resource management. Prerequisite: MSC 230

MSC313: Coastal Law (3 cr, Fall) Basic doctrines and public policy related to the use and regulation of the United States coastal zone and seabed. Prerequisite: Junior standing

MSC314: Ocean Law (3 cr, Spring) The principles of international ocean law regarding ocean management; ocean delimitation and issues of environmental ocean regulation within international legal framework. Prerequisite: Junior standing, or permission of instructor.

MSC316: Global Primary Production (3 cr, Fall) This course reviews the magnitude and the processes that shape primary production in terrestrial, oceanic, and freshwater habitats. It includes the fate of primary production in the earth’s biomes, and the role of terrestrial and aquatic productivity in regulating, and responding to, variable climate. Prerequisite:  BIL 160

MSC317: Earth’s Biogeochemistry (3 cr, Fall) Outstanding features of planet Earth, including its vast oceans, climate and atmosphere, are strongly impacted by life. Scientists investigate these impacts, such as ocean acidification, variable atmospheric CO2 concentrations, coastal anoxia, and permafrost melting, through their biogeochemical dynamics. Prerequisite: CHM 111 or 112

MSC 318: Ecological Genetics (3 cr, Fall) This course will provide a thorough understanding of genetics (allele frequencies, heritability, recombination, qtl, the effect of migration and demography).  Pre-requisites: BIL 150/151 and BIL160/161

MSC323: Invertebrate Zoology (3 cr, Spring) Biology of invertebrates, with emphasis on tropical and subtropical marine forms. Field work and combined lecture-laboratory sessions. Prerequisite: MSC230.

MSC324: The Biology of Fishes (3 cr, Spring) Selected topics on the ecology and physiology of fishes. Lectures on reproduction, respiration, osmoregulation, sense systems, and hormonal control. Prerequisite: MSC230.

MSC325: Biological Oceanographic Techniques (3 cr, by announcement only) Methodology of use to biological oceanographers. Field sampling of plankton and benthic biomass and productivity. Methodology of selected physical and chemical parameters. Experimental design and use of remote sensing in oceanographic studies. Prerequisite: MSC 230

MSC326: Marine Genomics (3 cr, Spring) Intensive lecture/laboratory course with emphasis on using genomic tools to address an independent research project of importance in the marine sciences. Prerequisite: BIL 250; Co-requisite: MSC463

MSC327: Marine Animal Neurophysiology and Behavior (3 cr, Fall) This course will look at neural and endocrine systems in a variety of marine animal invertebrate and vertebrate models and how these systems work together to control elements of physiology, sensation and perception of the environment and behavior. Prerequisite: MSC 230 and BIL255

MSC328: Introduction To Aquaculture (3 cr, Fall) This course will provide an introduction to the field of aquaculture, which represents one of the fastest growing industries in food production in the worlds and is a field that offers exciting job opportunities in science, business, marketing, resource management, and socioeconomics. Pre-requisite: MSC111 Pre/Co-req: MSC230

MSC329: Marine Vertebrate Zoology (3 cr, Spring) The course will be a comprehensive examination of the form and function of the vertebrate lineage of marine animals from early chordates to the evolution of cartilaginous and bony fish and the emergence of tetrapods, those that evolved from marine ancestors and have since returned to the seas. Prerequisite: MSC 230

MSC333: Ocean Human Health (3 cr, Spring) The focus of this course is on the present, future, and potential effects of oceanic processes and marine organisms on human health and wellbeing and on human impacts on the marine environment. Prerequisites: MSC230

MSC340: Ocean Policy (3 cr, Spring) Analysis of ocean policy issues in US fisheries, marine conservation and marine protected areas, marine pollution, coastal management and regulation of offshore oil and gas activities. Corequisite: MSC313 or MSC314 Junior standing

MSC342: Decision Making and the Environment (3 cr, Spring) A basic, critical appreciation of interdisciplinary decision theory as applied to natural resources management. Specific goals include comprehension of: decision making under uncertainty, evolutionary social science, managing common pool resources, and behavioral economics.  Prerequisite: Junior standing

MSC345: Economics of Natural Resources and the Environment (3 cr, Spring) A comprehensive overview of the economics of national, international, and global environmental problems. Economic reasoning is used to examine causes and consequences of environmental and resource problems, and measures for dealing with them. Prerequisite: ECO211

MSC346: Climate Science and Policy (3 cr, Spring) The scientific evidence for, and the projected consequences of, climate change. The political and geo-engineering responses to the problem. Prerequisites: Junior standing, or permission of instructor.

MSC347:  Polar Science and Policy (3cr, Spring) The course will address the physical, chemical, and biological properties of the polar oceans, atmosphere, and coastal regions. The interactions between ocean, ice, atmosphere, and land will be discussed in detail, not only in terms of local relationships, with cross-disciplinary linkages, but also with emphasis on the influence the Polar Regions exert on the global climate, biogeochemical cycles, ecosystems and local human populations. The course will be taught by faculty members who have a wealth of first- hand experience in the field.  Prerequisites: MSC111and MSC230

MSC350: Survey of Marine Mammals (3 cr, Fall) The evolution and ecology of the cetaceans, pinnipeds, manatees, and allies: Natural history, zoogeography, physiology, husbandry, and biomedical aspects. Prerequisite: MSC230.

MSC351: Physical-Biological Interaction In Ocean Ecosystems I (3 cr, Spring) Part 1 of a 2 course sequence encompassing physical oceanography, marine ecosystems and fisheries. Prerequisites: MTH162 or MTH172

MSC352: Physical-Biological Interaction In Ocean Ecosystems II (3 cr, Spring) Part 2 of 2 course sequence encompassing physical oceanography, marine ecosystems and fisheries. Prerequisite: MSC351. Corequisite: MSC204

MSC355: Limnology (3cr, Spring) This course is an introduction to the physical, chemical, and biological properties of freshwater ecosystems.  It emphasizes the ecological process of lakes, rivers, and to less extent, streams. The role of watershed  processes is considered in the context of management of rivers and estuaries. Prerequisite: MSC 230 or Permission of instructor

MSC364: Life in Moving Fluids (3 cr, Fall) The physical characteristics of air and water are described in relation to various flow phenomena that play a part in life functions. Adaptations of form and function reflect the very different properties of the media (air and water) of terrestrial and aquatic life. Prerequisite: MSC230, and either PHY101 or PHY205.

MSC370: Current Research in Marine Biology: Seminars and Discussion (2 cr, Fall) These discussions and seminars comprising a 2 cr course provide well-prepared undergraduate students interested in marine research with an introduction to graduate student-presented science in the specialization of marine biology.

MSC371: Readings in Marine Science (1- 2 cr, Fall, Spring and Summer) Library research with faculty supervision; bibliography to be submitted in preparation for laboratory and/or field research project. Maximum 3 credits count towards major or minor.

MSC372: Special Topics in Marine Science (1-2 cr, by announcement only) Content varies by semester and is indicated in parentheses following course number and title in class schedule.

MSC380: Field Studies in Marine and Aquatic Science (1-4 cr, by announcement only) Field course to selected marine, estuarine and/or aquatic sites in the United States and abroad. Travel fee may be required.

MSC381: Marine Field Ornithology (1-4 cr, Fall, Spring, and Summer) This course will provide an introduction to waterbird biology and conservation, including a variety of different field trips to waterbird communities.

MSC390: Studies in Marine Science (1-5 cr, transfer courses only) Course designation used for courses taken outside of UM with no UM equivalent. Not offered.

MSC391: Studies in Marine Policy (1-5 cr, transfer courses only) Course designation used for courses taken outside of UM with no UM equivalent. Not offered.

MSC403: Marine Environmental Toxicology (3 cr, Spring) This course will provide an introduction to the principles of environmental toxicology with an emphasis on marine ecosystems, considering a variety of different classes of toxicants, how they can impact marine organisms, the scientific methods used to assess impacts, and the regulatory frameworks used to monitor and manage their release to the environment.

MSC404: Marine Organismal Biology and Environmental Health Research (1 cr, Spring) This 1 credit course will complement salt water semester courses. (Must have taken MSC403 or MSC333 and either MSC466 or MSC326 and MSC463). Students will be required to collect and analyze samples, interpret their findings and present them in a formal laboratory report due two weeks after the trip. Students will also be required to give a presentation they have prepared before the trip and attend two seminars on Marine Organismal and Environmental Health topics. Perquisites: Permission of Instructor

MSC410: Marine Conservation Science (3 cr, Spring) An advanced undergraduate course in conservation science with case studies and field work; it is designed to cover marine ecology and the science information needs of tropical marine parks and protected areas with a focus on the particular threats to Caribbean protected areas. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

MSC411:  Projects in Marine Science (1-3 cr, Fall, Spring, and Summer) Individual, independent research projects with faculty supervision. A formal written report is required that satisfies signed contract with faculty supervisor. No more than 6 credits in total from MSC371, MSC411, and MSC412 can be counted towards the MSC major or minor requirements. Requisites: Instructor Consent

MSC412: Undergraduate Thesis in Marine Science (1cr, Fall, Spring, and Summer) Undergraduate thesis in Marine Science. Students will write a formal thesis summarizing the results of independent research carried out under faculty supervision.  Prerequisite or co-requisite: MSC411 and permission of instructor

MSC415: Coral Reef Science and Management (3 cr, Spring) This interdisciplinary course examines the nature of coral reef science and management; biological, environmental, ecological and socioeconomic aspects of coral reef science, coral reef management problems and approaches at local to global scales, and the implications of climate change for coral reef science and management. Prerequisite: MSC 230

MSC417: Marine Biota and Biogeochemical Cycles (3 cr, Fall) The distribution of dissolved and particulate materials in the sea is not uniform in time and space. This variability reflects the diverse sources, transformations, and sinks of chemical constituents in the sea. This course focuses on the role of marine organisms. Prerequisite: MSC215

MSC420: Political Ecology of the Galapagos (3 cr, Spring UGalapagos semester only) This field course in the Galapagos National Park offers a rare chance to examine the human interactions in this highly politicized landscape of conservation. Students practice the political ecology approach for doing ethnographic field work and explore how it can lead to wiser resource management. Part of UGalapagos semester.

MSC421: Terrestrial Biology and Adaptations of the Galapagos (3 cr, Spring UGalapagos semester only) This course will examine the terrestrial plant and animal life of Isabela Island, discuss the biology and how it adapted to life on Isabela. Through field and laboratory exercises we will explore the power of organisms’ DNA in shaping life into unique forms like those famously present in today’s Galapagos. Part of UGalapagos semester.

MSC422: Marine Ecology of the Galapagos (3 cr, Spring UGalapagos semester only) This course focuses on marine ecosystems of the Galapagos, emphasizing near-shore environments. Topics will include how the unique location and oceanography of the Galapagos have shaped the species composition of resident and migrant marine animals. The role of genetic drift, local habitat characteristics and natural selection on marine ecosystems will be examined. Part of UGalapagos semester.

MSC423: Marine Conservation Biology & Fisheries of the Galapagos (3 cr, Spring UGalapagos semester only) The Galapagos are located in a uniquely productive area of the sea, which has allowed the development of a rich and unique marine biota. The first week of the course will carry the students through the dynamic, climatic, and oceanographic circumstances that determine the unique character of the Galapagos. The second week will cover scientific evaluation of the threats to the marine biodiversity of the Galapagos, focusing on sharks, penguins, sea turtles and other at-risk species and habitats. Prerequisite: BIL 160 or MSC 230 and Permission of Instructor.

MSC424: Origin and Geology of the Galapagos Islands (3 cr, Spring UGalapagos semester only) This course will explore the origin and geology of volcanic oceanic islands, using the Galapagos Islands as a natural laboratory. The emphasis of this course will be to lay out the underlying geological processes that have led to the formation of the islands and to their present state, and then to explore the ways the physical environment has influenced adaptation and biodiversity.  Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. MSC424 fulfills GSC requirement for MSC students.

MSC425: Galapagos Community-Based Research and Service (2 cr, Spring UGalapagos semester only) Individual, civic engagement activities identified in consultation with the people, national park and local government of Puerto Villamil, Isla Isabela, as part of the marine science semester program in the Galapagos Islands. Student research and service is faculty supervised and concluded by submission of a formal written report. This course may not be counted towards the MSC elective requirement for majors or minors.

MSC427: Galapagos split-semester field course (2 cr, Summer) Field course in the southern Galapagos Islands is a companion course to the lecture course MSC426. MSC427 provides students with the first-person knowledge and opportunity for research in the topics covered in the previous lecture course, encompassing the flora, fauna, geology, and society of the Galapagos Islands. Prerequisite: MSC426

MSC432: Comparative Ecology of Terrestrial and Marine Systems (3 cr, by announcement only) The course stresses proximate mechanisms and underlying evolutionary processes. Analysis methods and models of various ecosystems are compared and critiqued. Prerequisites: MTH162, BIL 330

MSC460: Spatial Applications in Marine Science (3 cr, Fall and Spring) The concepts and marine applications of Geographic Information Systems. Every class period will entail short class lectures and hands on computer based GIS exercise on marine science related issues. Students will learn how to use ArcGIS 9.2 and create simple GIS models primarily using vector data. Prerequisites: MSC111 and junior standing or permission of instructor.

MSC462: Marine Biomedicine (3 cr, Spring) The course will cover diverse bioactive molecules that are derived from marine sources ranging from sponges to sharks. The isolation and characterization of these compounds as well as their potential application in clinical medicine and human health will be reviewed. The class will also cover marine-derived factors used in biotechnology and marine animal models used in biomedical research with an emphasis on marine immunology. Prerequisites: BIL 255 and CHM 112

MSC463: Marine Conservation Genetics (3 cr, Spring) This course seeks to integrate lectures, fieldwork and laboratory genetics to enhance an understanding of biodiversity, genetic diversity, and current conservation issues. Co-requisite: MSC326

MSC464: Marine Comparative Immunology Lab (1 cr, Fall) The laboratory course will cover immunology techniques used in the assessment of immune function and immune reactivity in diverse marine taxa from sponges to fish to mammals. Prerequisite: MSC465. Corequisite: MSC465

MSC465: Marine Comparative Immunology (3 cr, Fall) This course will cover the immune function in diverse marine taxa from sponges to fish and the evolution of immune mechanisms from a comparative point of view. Adaptations related to living in a microbe-rich marine environment will be highlighted. Prerequisite: BIL 250 and 255

MSC466: Environmental Physiology: Oxygen, Water and Ion Regulatory Stress (3 cr, Fall) This intensive laboratory course combines and elaborates on concepts learned in BIL 360. Topics include homeostasis, interactions with the external environment, and life with limited oxygen and water. Prerequisite: BIL360 and Permission of instructor

Upperclassmen of good academic standing may take courses at the 500 level. Please click on the Current Students tab to find the course listing here